Liberal Writer: Saving Minority Babies Is Racist

Ben Johnson, Life Site News, September 4, 2012

The pro-life movement’s desire to save children of any race is a secret manifestation of racism and constitutes a war on “minorities and the poor,” according to a writer for The Atlantic.

Brian Fung, who serves as the prestigious magazine’s associate editor, made that claim in an article entitled “The Quiet Racism of Abortion Bans.”

Fung wrote the Republican “war on women” is “really an attack on women of a specific stripe: those from disadvantaged minorities and the poor.”

“An abortion ban would disproportionately affect women from non-white and low-income backgrounds,” he wrote, proving the pro-life movement’s “inherent racial and socio-economic unfairness.”

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Critics find his analysis too clever by half.

The blogger William Teach wrote, “That’s exactly what the GOP is attempting to do, to make sure there are more Black, Latino, and other minority children not being aborted so that the country will have more Black, Latino, and other minorities because we hate Blacks, Latinos, and other minorities.”

Fung is not the first journalist in the prestige media to equate the pro-life movement’s zeal to save unborn minority children with racial enmity.

The Washington Post Dana Milbank wrote in late May that Trent Franks’ Prenatal Non­discrimination Act risked “alienating Asian-Americans” and stemmed from “Franks’ ­paternalism toward minority groups.”

However, pro-lifers point out racism seems to be alive and well among abortionists.

Ashutosh Ron Virmani, an abortion provider in Charlotte, North Carolina, boasted that he aborts “ugly black babies.”

“Ashutosh Virmani is a brazen racist and his statement supports what we already know of the billion dollar abortion industry—black babies are targeted because they are seen as poor, worthless and maybe even ‘ugly,’” Day Gardner, president of the National Black Pro-Life Union, told LifeSiteNews.com.

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