Racism Dries Up in the Desert Heat

Ann M. Simmons and Doug Smith, Los Angeles Times, December 19, 2011

{snip}

[…] Lancaster, population 157,000, leads Los Angeles County in black-white integration.

A Times analysis has found that Lancaster has more blocks with a “substantial” mix–meaning that at least a quarter of the residents are white and a quarter are black–than any neighborhood in the city of Los Angeles, or any other city in the county.

Some of Lancaster’s integration probably came about by accident: Residents bought tracts in master-planned subdivisions without knowing who their neighbors would be. They “bought blind,” as Darren Parker, head of the Antelope Valley Human Relations Task Force, put it. When housing prices slumped, no one could afford to move.

The result–block after block of integrated neighborhoods and no concentrated black “inner city” to speak of–is a rare exception in the county, where, nearly half a century after the civil rights movement, blacks and whites remain mostly segregated in terms of housing.

In Lancaster, integration has been a mixed blessing. Although many residents say it has improved understanding, tensions surface periodically: In the 1990s, skinheads’ attacks on blacks drew national attention, and more recently, civil rights groups accused officials of waging “an unrelenting war” against Lancaster’s Section 8 housing recipients, who are mostly black.

{snip}

Once nearly all white, Lancaster had become 20% black by 2010 as upwardly mobile African Americans from Los Angeles moved in.

{snip}

Some white residents lament the area’s changes, although they were hesitant to speak openly of race. “Houses have sold, gone downhill and sold again,” Judy Kempel, a white substitute teacher, said of the neighborhood where she has lived more than 40 years. “There are families moving in with many children. Sorry to say it, but they don’t always keep their places up.”

One white teenager said he thought educational standards had dropped because of the large number of African Americans attending his school. Classes are so dumbed down, he said, that “it’s a challenge to fail.” {snip}

But blacks and whites mostly downplayed the role of race in everyday affairs.

Although students at Lancaster High School on a recent weekday appeared to socialize with others of the same race, many said they didn’t even notice the ethnic grouping.

“I don’t think race is an issue at this school,” said Shaylise Carroll, 16, an African American, as she joshed with other black students on the sidelines at a football practice. “Everybody’s friends with everybody.”

{snip}

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  • Hirsch

    A cursory reading of the CIA Factbook online or even auditing one Environmental Sciences class will tell you all you need to know about the West and the Southwest. Los Angeles is a desert, and it will become a desert again once scarcity and peak crises converge as they are destined to soon. This is not the talk of a reactionary or survivalist. This is mainstream knowledge.

    If you think conflict over oil begets ugly violence, wait until you see sectarian struggles over water, and gee, I wonder how and along what lines people will begin to group themselves when survival is at stake.

  • Anonymous

    “Once nearly all white, Lancaster had become 20% black by 2010 as upwardly mobile African Americans from Los Angeles moved in.”

    No offense to any AmRenners in the Mojave, but the Palmdale/Lancaster area is not anyplace LA residents choose to move to if they’re “upwardly mobile,” regardless of race. White people move out of LA to Lancaster because it’s cheaper and whiter than LA. Blacks from LA move to Lancaster because the Mexicans are numerically overwhelming former southside ghettos like Compton and South Central, turning them into barrios, and making blacks feel uncomfortable and unsafe.

    To my knowledge, and contrary to what this article will try to convince you, the influx of blacks and browns to once-white, once-small Palmdale/Lancaster is NOT going smoothly. The whites there resent the changes to their towns very much. If traditional American residents of these deteriorating desert communities are “hesitant to speak openly of race”, that should not be interpreted as the success of integration. Rather it is the success of Political Correctness and white self-censorship.

  • Rob

    I grew up in this town back in the 60’s and 70’s and still keep in contact with some people still living there and they are very sad and sickened as to what has happened to their town and neighborhoods and schools. Section 8 ghetto-dwellers from South LA moved in and of course brought all their problems with them and as usual nobody is allowed to speak openly about it.

  • norm

    Residential integration occurs only when white families cannot afford the ADDED EXPENSE OF LILLY WHITE AREAS. The lack of legal segregation hujrts whites of the lower middle and working classes.

  • Question Diversity

    Steve Sailer did a semi-fictional based on reality story a few years ago called “Unreal Estate.” The reason that the High Desert has become as black as it is, is because blacks from South Los Angeles were prodded to move out of Los Angeles and into the Subprime Valley, as the “flippers” of finished but uninhabited houses, at the point where they realized they couldn’t get the insane selling prices they once did, a financial inevitability (I’ve been through all that before), and seeing the futility of being a regular landlord to regular renters, decided to become Section 8 landlords. At the same time, the city fathers of Los Angeles wanted to get rid of their ghetto blacks, in order to make life safe for SWPL whites and their Hispanic cheap labor. I’m sure there was an under the radar concerted effort to get Section 8 and project blacks out of the San Gabriel Valley and into the high desert.

  • sbuffalonative

    The headline is misleading if not an outright distortion of the article itself.

    I had expected to read that there was a town that had the perfect racial balance, where everyone got along, and no one was concerned about the situation. That’s not what this piece is telling us.

    Apparently, because of economic conditions, people are forced to remain in their homes because they can’t sell their houses. That’s not an example of racism drying up. It’s an example of people being trapped.

    Clearly everyone sees the problems around them and they aren’t happy. Even a white teenager realizes that educational standards are falling. People know it’s a racial issue but they’re trapped so they have to watch what they say. Being around blacks, whites are forced to put on their fake smiles and pretend everything is fine.

    Is this the racial utopia people envision?

  • Anonymous

    “I don’t think race is an issue at this school,” said Shaylise Carroll, 16, an African American, as she joshed with other black students on the sidelines at a football practice.

    Sounds about like what they say after there’s been a black on white killing or mugging or general mayhem, “It’s not about race”, “nothing to see here”. All her comments did was make me wonder all the more what is going on. Probably what I’ve experienced myself dealing with this wonderful racism free society (except for white racism of course).

  • Bon, From the Land of Babble

    Once nearly all white, Lancaster had become 20% black by 2010 as upwardly mobile African Americans from Los Angeles moved in.

    LIES!! (but no one should expect otherwise from the LA Slimes).

    Poster #2 puts it exactly right: the Palmdale/Lancaster area is not anyplace LA residents choose to move to if they’re ‘upwardly mobile,’ regardless of race.

    Urban blacks and browns moved or were forced out to Lancaster because of Section 8 housing. Some Section 8 projects in LA sat on valuable land that developers wanted for condos; black and brown residents were given vouchers and sent off to the vastly overdeveloped desert areas.

    The mayor of Lancaster, R. Rex Parris, has (correctly) alleged that the Los Angeles County Housing Authority has dumped Section 8 residents in Lancaster, but kept the money from the program in downtown L.A.

    I am at war with Section 8, Lancaster mayor R. Rex Parris said. I would do anything I legally could to stop the inundation of Section 8 housing into our community. The Section 8 program is moving the urban poor into the suburbs, destroying hard-working family neighborhoods.

    Results of which:

    civil rights groups accusing officials of waging ‘an unrelenting war’ against Lancaster’s Section 8 housing recipients, who are mostly black.

    Investigator Gary Brody would bring 15 armed officers with him on sweeps, threatening voucher holders that he would obtain search warrants if they did not consent to searches.

    From 2006 to 2010, 59% of all proposed terminations in L.A. County came from Lancaster and Palmdale — though the two cities had only 17% of the county’s Section 8 tenants.

    I avoid Lancaster and Palmdale as much as possible.

    Bon

  • Anonymous

    Superficial anomalies like this that the liberal press tries to foist on us all the time rarely, if ever, hold up under scrutiny, as the excellent selection of comments above illustrates.

    The ‘hate facts’ of race realism simply cannot be denied.

    The Bell Curve analysis prevails.

    The block-busting and town-busting of Eric ‘My People’ Holder’s criminally Afrocentric DOJ and the sledge hammer of Sec. 8 social engineering keeps pounding away.

    Woe is us.

    NOBAMA 2012

  • Cliff Yablonski

    This feel good puff-piece doesn’t tell the real story about the crime rate in Lancaster, which is has been rising and has become more violent than anything seen 30 years ago when Lancaster-Palmdale was primarily white.

  • Anonymous

    In Lancaster, integration has been a mixed blessing. Although many residents say it has improved understanding, tensions surface periodically: In the 1990s, skinheads’ attacks on blacks drew national attention, and more recently, civil rights groups accused officials of waging “an unrelenting war” against Lancaster’s Section 8 housing recipients, who are mostly black.

    Oh, and I’m sure blacks did nothing to egg them on! It reminds me of the movie American History X where they said they formed that white neo nazi gang to protect themselves from the black and mexican gangs. Yeah, I knew there were a few parts of their actions I didn’t condone (like trashing the grocery store), but most of the time the skinheads were fighting off blacks who were terrorizing their neighborhoods and harrassing the whites. Just like most white men did in the old days. They didn’t go out just bored and start harrassing blacks and mexicans. They beat them up or killed them because the blacks and mexicans had (or at least they thought) committed a violent crime against a white person.

  • Anonymous

    The article did not mention that Lancaster and Palmdale have the highest crime rates in the Antelope Valley and that the blacks are responsible for almost all the crime.

    The blacks are starting to do to the Lancaster schools what they did to every other school where there are more than 5 percent of blacks.

    Every time the school administration attempts to enforce order and civilized behavior among the blacks, the reverends and welfare mammas rant and rave and the Los Angeles Times supports the feral black youth.

    Lancaster will soon become like Compton, Maywood and Ingelewood did in teh 1960’s when blacks moved in and drove Whites out by force and violence.

    Incidentally, almost all the black residents of Lancaster and Palmdale are Los Angeles city and county affirmative action goverment employees. The developers marketed their tract homes in the wilderness to the mostly black civil service back in the 1980’s.

    The Los Angeles news stations seem to make a feature of Lancaster and Palmdale crime. The theme is; why oh why has this happened in this lovely new city of 3,000 sq feet Spanish style new homes with swimming pools?

    We know why, those lovely homes are inhabited by blacks.

    For the last few years the city has really been cracking down on black crime, school disruption and section 8 crime, noise and violations of city ordinances regarding trash and parking.

    This article, like most Los Angeles Times articles about blacks probably came from an ACLU ADL AJC SPLC NAACP press release. With the city cracking down on black crime, the anti White pro black organizations want to create the impression that Lancaster is a lovely place with no black crime or school destruction and that any crime is caused by the mythical skinheads SPLC ADL is so skilled at creating.

    Next article will be about an Aryan Brother Hood White Supremacist cell in Lancaster. It will consist of ATF, FBI and SPLC provacateurs.

    If you are White, don’t move to Lancaster, Palmdale or any other area in Antelope Valley. It will soon become like the black areas of Riverside and San Bernadino counties.

  • Anonymous

    Poster 5 Question Diversity is absolutely right. I have followed the Antelope Valley news for 20 years. It’s back to the bad old days of the 40’s and 50’s in the Bronx and the south and west sides of Chicago.

    As soon as you see a black face, get out. Sell before property values fall and fall and fall.

    One of my grandmother’s cousins built a 2 townhouse style mansions on a 2 acre lot in the Hyde Park section of Chicago in the 1920’s for $70,000. The blacks took over during the 30’s and 40’s. They sold the place for $8,000 in the mid fifties.

    Even 5 percent of blacks destroy a school. The civil service children are as bad as the children of the criminals.

    In some of those rural prison towns, the children of the black prison guards, nurses and others are worse than the children of the prisoners who come to the towns with their mothers to live near the baby daddy.

  • Anonymous

    I saw the headline Sunday in the newspaper box. I knew exactly what it would say.

    I assume the article is in response to some new black on White atrocity.

  • [email protected]

    OT “Los Angeles is a desert, and it will become a desert again once scarcity and peak crises converge as they are destined to soon.”

    http://www.spannertech.com/water/

    It also has a scarcity of groundwater, and definitely not nearly enough to support it’s 20 million plus population. Much of their water supply is sent to them from the mountains. If there ever was a disruption in water delivery, it would make Mad Max look like child’s play. I’ve wondered why they haven’t developed large-scale desalination plants, at least as a back-up.

  • Anonymous

    I know that it’s a bit late to post a reply here, but things aren’t as gloomy as they seem in Lancaster, CA with regard to blacks and the perception this article has left. I live in a neighboring city and work in Lancaster as a teacher.

    Many of the blacks are not settled here. Many of the black parents of the children in the school I work at are talking openly about moving to Atlanta, GA or some other place back east. I have also heard Houston TX come up in conversation too. One black girl said they will be “moving to Las Vegas”. When I asked “when?”, she stated, “once daddy gets his ankle bracelet taken off!”.

    A black teacher I work with is moving with her three children to Phoenix this year in Summer.

    I think when the City of Lancaster, the City of Palmdale and the local LA Sheriff stations started to crack down, it made the ghetto blacks feel uncomfortable.

    I think there is general dissatisfaction with California as a whole in the black community and Lancaster is just the last stepping stone before they finally leave the state altogether.

  • Phil McKann

    1st… please make a donation to this important site. Amren.

    2nd… true story: In the early 90’s, demand for new houses in Lancaster was so high that they actually held lotteries for the privilege to overpay for a tract home. My vanpool driver “won” such a lottery, but the market crashed a few weeks later. He was left paying a premium mortgage in a neighborhood that went all Section 8 and his was the only white and mortgage-paying household in the neighborhood.

    One evening he was returning from a movie with his family and caught a 13-year-old boy emerging from his bathroom window. When confronted, the thug replied “this ain’t none of your business, it’s a ‘G’ thang,” at which point my vanpool driver broke the kid’s arm over his knee like a stick.

    A couple hours later calmer heads prevailed and my vanpool driver thought “jesus, what did I just get myself involved in?” He loaded up a trailer with as much of his posessions as he could and fled his house in the middle of the night, like Dolly Madison fleeing the British.

    There is no “blind buying” with happenstance resulting in integrated neighborhoods. There is only regular buying and government meddling. The blacks noted in this article were not fellow home buyers, they were drawn in by government-subsidized programs.

  • What_I_Believe

    13 — Anonymous wrote at 2:34 PM on December 20:

    Even 5 percent of blacks destroy a school.

    ______________________________________________

    This is very true. It’s astonishing how small a percentage it takes to destroy a school or neighborhood. yet at the same time, considering their nature, it’s no surprise at all.