Low Test Scores? Blame Race

Michael Maresh, Rio Grande Sun, December 15, 2011

An Española School District administrator is blaming the District’s low test scores on the high number of Hispanics who attend the high school in comparison with other nearby school districts.

In a PowerPoint presentation to the Española School Board Dec. 7, Curriculum and Instruction Director Christiana Blea-Valdez said Española’s ACT scores cannot be compared to Los Alamos or La Cueva High School because of differences in the racial makeup of the districts.

She said 69 percent of students at Los Alamos are Caucasian while 24 percent are Hispanic. At La Cueva almost 68 percent of the students are Caucasian, while 29 percent are Hispanic.

Nearly 90 percent of Española’s students are Hispanic, according to state Education Department data.

According to information Blea-Valdez provided to the Board on Dec. 2, Española’s students had the lowest 2009 ACT scores in English, math and reading and tied for last in science when compared with the school districts of Gadsen, Moriarty, Pojoaque and Rio Grande.

“It’s unfair to compare any school district in the state to Los Alamos,” she said.

{snip}

Blea-Valdez, who makes $75,500 a year, said a better comparison for Esapñola would be school districts with similar demographics. She said the Pojoaque School District would be a good gauge because Española loses many students to this neighboring district every year. She also said Española needs to convince its students to take the test more than once, adding students almost always do better on subsequent tests.

School Board President Coco Archuleta was upset with Blea-Valdez’s assertion that Española’s students score low on tests because a majority of them are Hispanic.

“I do not see how being poor or Hispanic has anything to do with learning,” he said.

{snip}

Archuleta called Blea-Valdez’s comments a poor example and a bad excuse, saying all school districts can be compared with each other. He said the expectations could be higher at other school districts but scores have nothing to do with race.

Blea-Valdez tried to backtrack at the meeting, saying in no way did she mean poor or Hispanic students cannot learn, and explained afterward, on Dec. 9, that she was trying to tell the Board the reasons Española’s schools cannot be compared to schools with different demographics.

{snip}

Board member Floyd Archuleta also did not buy Blea-Valdez’s explanation that the high number of Hispanic students is the primary reason why Española’s test scores are low.

“A lot of our students who have come out of our schools are doing well,” he said.

{snip}

Blea-Valdez said the only way scores will improve is for the entire community to come together with the focus being to give students the same opportunities as what students receive in other school districts.

{snip}

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  • neanderthalDNA

    “Coco”? Coco Archuleta?

    “He said the expectations could be higher at other school districts but scores have nothing to do with race.”

    Oh I’m sure ol “Coco” knows his educababble and duckspeak.

    “Blea-Valdez tried to backtrack at the meeting, saying in no way did she mean poor or Hispanic students cannot learn, and explained afterward, on Dec. 9, that she was trying to tell the Board the reasons Española’s schools cannot be compared to schools with different demographics.”

    What? How can one say so little that pertains so tangentially to that which is being answered? It’s like two people making almost random statements who appear to be addressing each other. Of course we know what Blea-Valdez meant to begin with. Whether she realized it or not.

    But here’s the real comic kicker, when “Floyd” Archuleta chimes lamely in…

    ““A lot of our students who have come out of our schools are doing well,” he said.” Can’t argue with that, I guess. Depending on what “a lot” and “doing well” mean…

    But like every good classic sitcom plot where all is restored to its original state (of vacuous, meaningless, stupidity)…

    “Blea-Valdez said the only way scores will improve is for the entire community to come together with the focus being to give students the same opportunities as what students receive in other school districts.”

    Give what? Caucasian and Eastasian classmates?

    Coco…

  • Ben N Indiana

    ‘Racist’, by definition, seems to be one who tells the truth.

  • Anonymous

    Is Blea-Valdez a white lady married to a latino, or a straight-up latino?

    I know several white women who have married latinos and – guess what – become big-time advocates for open borders and legalization.

    I know several white people who work for “Make the Road”, a big-time latino immigrant organization on the east coast, and they are militant about it (and very leftist too).

    I understand different groups wanting to promote their agenda, but how can a person of one race work for an organization that blatantly seeks to move its own different race forward?

    Can you imagine a chinese person, or a mexican, joining a pro-white organization and working for the promotion of white culture, rights or success?

    But you see white people all the time joining organizations of race x, y or z and working tirelessly for their success over whites.

  • Cape to Cairo

    Maybe a better comparison for “Espanola” would be “Tijuana.”

  • Ian J. MacAllister

    “Hispanic” isn’t a race; it’s a cultural-linguistic category. “Caucasian” and “Hispanic” are not at all opposites.

    By “Hispanic,” they undoubtedly mean mestizo.

  • olewhitelady

    Of course, a race apologist can always claim that non-whites like Hispanics are behind because of bigotry instead of biology. The problem is that the lower scoring school will be expected to somehow show improvement, and that can only mean plunging standards and/or cheating to demonstrate higher grades.

  • Istvan

    5 — Ian J. MacAllister wrote at 5:14 AM on December 17: By “Hispanic,” they undoubtedly mean mestizo.

    Actually they mean anyone with a Spanish surname or Spanish/Latin American ancestry which includes people of European, African, Amerindian and assorted combinations of those groups, not just mestizos.

  • Anonymous

    @ Istvan#7– Thanks for that nugget. So I reckon I can go down to the courthouse and change my surname from McAllister to Valdez and I’ll be Hispanic??

  • Istvan

    8 — Anonymous wrote at 1:07 PM on December 17:

    @ Istvan#7— Thanks for that nugget. So I reckon I can go down to the courthouse and change my surname from McAllister to Valdez and I’ll be Hispanic??

    Technically you do not even need to change your name. There are Irish Mexicans (Chinese Cubans, Polish Argentinians, etc.) but if you look unmistakeably white and speak no Spanish that would be a good idea.

  • John Engelman

    As long as Curriculum and Instruction Director Christiana Blea-Valdez keeps her job, I hope she keeps telling the politically incorrect truth. I am afraid she will not keep her job for long, however.

  • on the lam from the Thought Police

    The first time I saw the title of this thread I thought is was, “Low Test Scores? Blame Racism,” as though whites are responsible for low Hispanic and black test scores. It is often dangerous to say anything critical of blacks and Hispanics unless you add that whites are somehow responsible.

    It is not their fault they are dangerous. It is our fault. If only we gave them bigger welfare checks they would be perfect citizens.

  • underdog

    RE: Istvan #9– I know a Chilean national illegal immigrant with Johnson for a surname. He looks like a deck hand on a Norwegian commercial fishing vessel and he told me that his grandparents immigrated to Chile from Norway. He has been in the States for 28+ years and has failed to learn even the most rudimentary survival level English. How shall we categorize him?

  • Istvan

    — underdog wrote at 8:36 PM on December 17:

    RE: Istvan #9— I know a Chilean national illegal immigrant with Johnson for a surname. He looks like a deck hand on a Norwegian commercial fishing vessel and he told me that his grandparents immigrated to Chile from Norway. He has been in the States for 28+ years and has failed to learn even the most rudimentary survival level English. How shall we categorize him?

    Hispanic

  • Josh Harlan

    Just maybe there are a few people in America who hear “Juan Rodriguez” and think he is Chilean. But very few. Here in AMERICA – where this letter is based, Juan is a Mexican or someone who comes from a little bit south of Mexico. If someone wants to call him Latino, Hispanic, or S**c, it is common usage, like they say. If he comes from Chile he is not a Latino in this country. Sorry if this upsets the hairsplitting.

  • Anonymous

    They are not hispanics or latinos. They are red mongoloids who only speak the language because their ancestors were defeated by the real white latino hispanic 500 yrs ago and forced to learn it or die.