Racial Tension Explodes in ANCYL

Quinton Mtyala, IOL News, October 3, 2011

Racial tension among Western Cape members of the ANC Youth League (ANCYL) have exploded into the open ahead of a crucial elective conference later this month.

At the heart of the tension is a call by some members of the youth league for increased representation of coloured people in leadership positions.

An internal document, distributed by supporters of Jonton Snyman, makes the case for greater involvement of coloured people in the leadership structures of the youth league after being “marginalised” by the ANCYL’s disbanded provincial executive.

Snyman, who is from Worcester, has been touted as a candidate for chairperson of the youth league in the Western Cape. The document says political discussion about the leadership of the ANCYL in the Western Cape cannot be complete without addressing the “National Question” and the “National Democratic Revolution”.

Although coloured youth were a significant demographic taking part in elections, the document argued that the ANCYL’s leadership in the Western Cape did not reflect this reality, the document said.

Though Africans made up the majority of youth league voters for the ANC, their support alone had “been insufficient to provide the ANC with electoral victory in this province”.

Coloured support, the document said, was a precondition for an ANC victory at the polls, where the party has suffered heavily due to factionalism.

“Opposition parties have since 1994 successfully continued to exploit the fears of coloured youth in general and the coloured urban working-class youth in particular. This fear of Africans emanates from decades of racial, social and spatial engineering,” the document states. “Many of our own leaders, cadres and members (both old and new) African, coloured and white may also not have fully overcome our psychological scars of the apartheid social engineering project.”

The ANC’s electoral decline, especially in coloured communities, coincided with a belief by the then ANC leadership, particularly after 2004, that coloured electoral support was not necessary for an ANC victory in the Western Cape, the document says.

The consequence of this, the authors argued, was that the ANC’s message was mostly directed at its traditional African support base.

The same argument was used by supporters of Marius Fransman as he squared off against Mcebisi Skwatsha to lead the ANC in the Western Cape, a race which was decided by the support of the ANCYL’s 21 delegates at February’s provincial conference.

Snyman said the “coloured issue” should not become an issue “just because Jonton raised it”.

“It will seem as if I’m doing this for my own personal ends,” said Snyman, who referred further queries to his spokesman Bheki Hadebe who could not be reached for comment last night.

Snyman’s main adversary for the position of provincial chairperson of the youth league in the Western Cape, Luvo Makasi, said the “coloured issue” was a red herring which was “opportunistically” raised.

Rather than looking for coloured leaders, “let us instead debate what the ANC has done wrong to lose the coloured vote”, Makasi said.

He later raised the question on his Facebook page, where commentators, many of them ANCYL members, were split on the issue, with some calling previous coloured leaders of the youth league in the Western Cape “incompetent” while others argued that the league could not ignore provincial demographics.

Four of the six ANC regions which have held their conferences have endorsed Makasi for the position of chairperson, with only the Dullah Omar (Cape Town Metro) region opting for Snyman and the Boland region still to hold its conference.

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  • Dutchman

    South African blacks remind me of the Haitians in their persecution of Mulattos. The 100% Africans must believe in the reverse ‘One Drop Rule”: a single drop of White blood means a person is White and subject to hatred. It’s really jealousy of course. One constant around the globe is light skinned prejudice. Almost all cultures, if not all of them, prefer fair skin to dark. Check out any 3rd World country that can afford an entertainment industry. The stars will usually be the fairest possible and with the most caucasoid (appealing) features.

  • Madison Grant

    So now whites and “coloreds” in South Africa and Zimbabwe are being victimized by institutional discrimination?

    So we can expect the mainsteam media to criticize them just as harshly as they did white-run SA and Rhodesia, right?

  • Anonymous

    The ANC’s actions and their leaders (as well as their main voters—blacks) are so appalling it’s no wonder coloured people may have lost faith in them. It looks like everyone but blacks in SA can see that incompetent leadership exists, and while incompetent leaders can and do exist in any race, they exist in disproportionate ratios among blacks (no black run country, city, area has been as prosperous).

    As long as blacks believe that if you don’t vote a black person in that you’re automatically racist, and keep denying that their leaders are incompetent, nothing can really change. Blacks should stop supporting any incompetent idiot as long as that person is black, but I doubt that will ever happen.

  • patthemick

    History is simply going to repeat itself. The coloureds will be a quick next on the list for extermination after the whites are gone. They will go the way of Haiti as they are slightly more intelligent and would assume leadership after the whites are gone. Jealousy of their ability will lead the chiefs of the purer blacks to label them almost white and enforce apartheid and then extermination against them. Then if history is any judge they’ll be killing each other over tribal differences.

  • Kenelm Digby

    I believe in South Africa ‘coloured’ means a racial hybrid of White/Malay/black/khoi etc etc.

    In South Africa they have an anomalous and insecure position.They are disliked by the blacks and distrusted by the Whites, in short they have no where to go.Blacks reject them and Whites won’t accept them.They have a reputation for being ‘scoundrels’.

  • Anonymous

    Dark skinned blacks are jealous of the lighter skinned….plain and simple. They specifically hate light skinned men and see them as a threat because they are likely smarter than the darks. On the other hand, the light skinned women are desired as a trophy wife.

    Blacks are fare more color conscious than any other group of people. Around here, light skinned blacks are called “high yellas” by the blacks.

  • Anonymous

    shades (forgive bad pun) of Haiti. Lift the civilizing force of the west and nature takes over. Soon SA will make its way to Bono’s list of crisis countries we should send aid to, and no liberal or msm will bring up why this occurred in the first place.

    I just don’t see how white liberals can continue to avoid reality.

  • Laager

    @ No5 Kenelm Digby

    “Coloured” in South Africa = Mulatto in the USA

    This was one of the 4 racial classifications from the formalised apartheid era from 1948 to 1990 when all the legislation was abolished

    The classifications were:

    Native/Bantu/Black

    Nomenclature changed over the years with political correctness.

    These were the 9 black southern African tribes;

    Zulu, Xhosa, Sotho, Tswana, Venda, Tsonga, Swazi, Pedi, Ndebele

    Indian

    All Indians brought in from India by the British c1860 into Natal Colony as Indentured Labourers to work in the sugar plantations

    Whites

    All white caucasian immigrants of European descent.

    There are two main groupings:

    Afrikaners – an amalgam of Dutch, French Huguenot and German immigrants who speak Afrikaans – a derivative of Dutch similar to Flemish

    English – descendants of English, Welsh, Scottish and Irish immigrants.

    SA also has a large Jewish community who through language are part of the English group

    Coloureds

    Broad brush: brown skinned people which included:

    (1) Descendants of the original Khoi-Khoi (Hottentot) and San (Bushmen) peoples

    (2) Malays – descendants of the original slaves brought in from Malaya and the Dutch East Indies by the Dutch East India Company to the Cape.

    They have retained their ethnic purity and are Muslims

    (3) Mixed race people from mainly white and black unions who have now grown in numbers to become a self sustaining independent ethnic group spread through all the provinces. In the Cape they are mainly Afrikaans speakers. In Natal and the old Transvaal they are English speakers.

    The Coloured people describe themselves as not being white enough during the apartheid era and many supported the ANC liberation movement to end apartheid.

    Now that apartheid is history they describe themselves as not being black enough as they are not accepted by the blacks. Black are very conscious of their tribal heritage language and customs and do not consider Coloureds to be part of them.

    I hope this assists with coming to grips with South Africa’s racial composition and nuances.