Drug Cartels Throw Parties for US Officials

Russia Today, September 20, 2011

Two American men that used to work undercover for the FBI say that they’ve exposed extensive incidents of corruption linking US law enforcement to Mexican drug cartels–no one, however, will hear them out.

Both Greg Gonzales and Wesley Dutton say they spent around 18 months working as informants for the Federal Bureau of Investigation along the US/Mexico border. It was there that they stumbled upon a slew of unjust activity carried out by of the big names in that part of America. Despite their findings, however, they tell the El Paso Times in Texas today that top-brass in the FBI won’t investigate their allegations.

Among their discoveries, says Dutton, is that drug kingpins put on parties to help out American officials.

“We . . . had information on campaign fundraisers and parties in La Union that the cartel held for officials from New Mexico and El Paso,” says Dutton. “A lot of important people were at those parties, such as bankers, judges, and law enforcement officers.”

Both Dutton and Gonzalez say that the FBI relieved them of their undercover roles once they exposed “big names” from America linked to those cartels. {snip}

Allegations are also reported in the interview that unreported campaign contributions to American politicians came from those cartels, with the intention of influencing the appointment of law enforcement officials. The men also allege that local law enforcement would aid in the delivery of drugs into the states. According to Gonzalez and Dutton, officials in the US would be onsite to receive drug drop offs and would then escort the shipments to their scheduled delivery spots.

{snip}

So far, the only responses Dutton and Gonzalez have received are threats against their life. They are taking their case up with a DC-based foundation named Judicial Watch.

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  • Anonymous

    Why is this a surprise to anyone? As America rushes forward to replace its judges, police, lawyers, and elected officials with Mexicans, we will see more “Mexican-style” behaviors.

    This type of corruption is normal in Mexico, and is becoming the norm in America, wherever Mexicans dominate.

  • Dan

    IF this is true, I don’t know that they will be around much longer. Cartels like Los Zetas regularly shoot, carve-up, and behead people for lesser reasons. Check out Mexican narco blogs sometime -really grisly and frequent stuff. Their gov’t is not able to contain this….last thing we need here. I don’t know; legalize, tax, and pay down debt? I suspect our gov’t would just keep spending

  • highduke

    Even I’m surprised! It’s not so hard now to accept that the invasion of Afghanistan was meant among other things to assert direct American control over opium production. PS: AmRen, unless my software is the issue, why does it appear that most reader comments from your recent articles are missing?

  • Lauren

    This is possibly the most important article Amren has posted all year. We KNEW that the Cartels were buying people in ‘our’ government. But I did not expect to read anything concrete about this, until decades after the fact.

    And notice that coverage of this has to come all the way from Russia. I doubt ‘our’ Press will ever touch the story.

  • Anonymous

    WE have so many corrupt and money hungry officials at ever level. It has been know for a long time that top government officials (including Presidents) have been on the take and sold us all out along with our country. Judges, police, etc. are no better, if not worse. The very few good ones left will be taken out and we will end up like Mexico, Africa, and the rest of the 3rd world. We have not been vigilant in a long long time in this country. That is the fastest way to lose one’s freedom and their country.

  • Anonymous

    Let’s end the Drug War that empowers these third-world gangsters. If someone wants to destroy themselves with drugs then that is their own damn right to, and we can use the income to pay off our debt.

  • Periapsis

    Now here’s concrete proof that our officials are on the take, and taking bribes from these vile Mestizos who’ll rape and behead white children for the fun of it. This is also yet more evidence that the white population of the world will have to resort to armed revolutions and carve white only ethnostates out of the rotting corpses of the U.S. and Europe, then begin eliminating hostile non-white populations who threaten our new homelands with invasion.

  • fred

    The dirty little secret of the drug war is that the cartels WANT drugs to be illegal. Not that I think drugs are a good thing. I’m just saying.

  • Anonymous

    The recent “beheading” at ATF is an even bigger aspect of the same story. ATF has long been considered the most nearly rogue and least effectively accountable of all federal law enforcement. Reportedly, it also is out front of others in its information

    exchange with $PLC. Birds of a feather.

  • Anonymous

    In fairness to law enforcement, there is in a free society a significant degree of necessity to be “involved” with crime groups and to make trade-offs, etc. But law enforcement internally has careful standards and boundaries for all this. A large part of the current problems ( e.g., reportedly in the case of some FBI Field Offices in the mid-West) is that too often

    what purports to be Internal Inspection is more nearly an External Image office. It’s part of the general cultural meltdown.

  • Anonymous

    One of the comments under the original article made a good point. They suggested if Gonzales and Dutton had evidence of big names involved, expose them by putting it out on the internet. Videos, filmed documents, etc. Don’t wait for the bureaucracy to do anything. They also suggested that they have kevlar and a few pistols so they can shoot back.

    I personally don’t doubt any of this. Look at Operation Fast & Furious. I wish them luck and Gods speed. And admonish them to make lots and lots of copies, don’t trust anyone and to constantly watch their backs. We need more of these kind of heros to bring our corrupt politicians house of cards tumbling down.

  • Anonymous

    3 — highduke wrote at 8:00 PM on September 22:

    Even I’m surprised! It’s not so hard now to accept that the invasion of Afghanistan was meant among other things to assert direct American control over opium production. PS: AmRen, unless my software is the issue, why does it appear that most reader comments from your recent articles are missing?

    ——————————————————–

    I remember reading at one time the CIA wanted to keep the opium fields blooming instead of eradicating them all. There was much debate about this and the CIA won obviously. Our top officials are all involved in the drug trade I believe. Remember Bill Clinton and Mena.

  • Anonymous

    And notice that coverage of this has to come all the way from Russia. I doubt ‘our’ Press will ever touch the story.

    ———————————————-

    I have noticed that the Russian press gives us more info than our own for some time now. Isn’t that odd? Maybe they are becoming freer while we are becoming more communistic? What irony.

    Turning our country around to what it used to be, is, I fear, a lost cause. There are too many powerful forces working against us while we have slept. They filled our country with uncaring,unassimiable, inferior 3rd world peoples who they knew would destroy White America and everything we held dear, all while we slept and did nothing. Gives new meaning to the term, sleeping giant, doesn’t it? They used force, fear and laws to keep us silent and now we are reaping the end results.

    So the question is, do we deserve what we have reaped?

  • Anonymous

    “The recent “beheading” at ATF is an even bigger aspect of the same story. ATF has long been considered the most nearly rogue and least effectively accountable of all federal law enforcement. Reportedly, it also is out front of others in its information exchange with $PLC. Birds of a feather. ”

    The Ruby Ridge murders started out as an ATF entrapment.

  • Strider

    Anonymous (#6) is right. Without this idiotic “drug war” there’s no black market, therefore no profit, therefore no cartels and no violence. (And one fewer excuse for the fascist police state we suffer under here.) It’s truly amazing how Americans have forgotten the lessons from liquor prohibition in the 1920s. What’s happening now is exactly what happened then, only worse. When the 18th Amendment was repealed in 1933, the black market instantly vanished and the violence instantly stopped. It took a Great Depression to end the liquor war; apparently it will take a Greater Depression to end the drug war, given how we’re already chin-deep in hock.

  • margaret

    I’ve been following the gunwalker fast and furious thing that resulted in the deaths of 2 American border patrol officers and more than 200 Mexicans.

    It seems to be a scheme to crack down on the 2nd amendment by making American gun shops and dealers look bad.

    Knowing how ADL SPLC operates and influences goverment agencies, I am beginning to wonder if ADL and SPLC, not DOJ and ATF agents came up with the idea. ADL and SPLC are gaining control over law enforcement agencies all over the country.

    Many gun rights advocats think Obama and Holder thought up project Gunwalker all on their own. I doubt it. I think the project was an ADL SPLC idea carried out by their ever reliable stooge, ATF.

  • Question Diversity

    16 Margaret:

    It’s pretty obvious now that F&F aka Gunwalker was designed to affect 2Amd politics. What I want Issa to dig into is this: Was it also designed to affect the immigration debate? But for F&F going haywire, I could easily imagine what Obama et al would be saying now: “How can you right wing bigots oppose immigration reform because of crime when your guns are causing all their crime problems?”

  • Anonymous

    #06 #15

    There is some informed and reasoned contention–not from an

    anti-drinking perspective, BTW–that Prohibition did in many locales and regions reduce the incidence of alcoholism and linked problems like domestic battery, liver disease, etc. The question, of course, is whether any putative gains were worth the costs you point to, and it is hard to see anyone suggesting they were.

  • Anonymous

    Reply to #18:

    I disagree. Prohibition EXACERBATED every problem associated with alcohol. It was a disaster, as is the current prohibition of drugs. I also note you cite no sources to back up your dubious claim.

  • Anonymous

    #20 It is a matter into which hard data / statistics / have

    been brought to bear belatedly. Yet, crime stats were so “loose”

    back then that the sample sizes required etc. all get to be issues of method. We must remain “Stat Friendly” whenever we have a chance.