Saggy Pants Banned on Fort Worth Buses

Tracy DeLatte, KDFW (Fort Worth), June 1, 2011

{snip} But a new code of conduct prohibits sagging on city buses.

Just like the requirement for a shirt and shoes, now those who want to ride The T actually have to wear their pants. It’s not a campaign. It’s The Fort Worth Transpiration Authority’s new policy.

The T said if a person refuses to abide by the rule they will be asked leave the loading premises. Otherwise they are considered trespassing.

{snip}

But the two week old rule is catching some resistance.

“He just said if you can’t pull up your pants you can’t get on the bus, so I just got off. I mean, I’m not gonna pull up my pants,” said Jaquiasia Hall.

De’Shawn Miller doesn’t understand the problem with saggy pants.

“This is something we grew up into. That’s why they don’t tell us nothing about sagging. We gonna sag regardless. We ain’t disrespectful. That’s how we were raised,” he said.

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  • Anonymous

    Saggy pants look stupid but at least it allows pursuing officers to make easy captures.

  • TTownTony

    Last weekend I was at a Cracker Barrel restaurant. Upon leaving the men’s room I was confronted with the rear view of a 400-lb black man bending over to pick up a child. As he did so his pants fell around his ankles revealing the most garish boxer shorts I have ever seen. He quickly pulled up his pants and whispered “excuse me” to the people around him. There were a few muffled laughs as this clown waddled off using one hand to hold the child and the other to hold up his enormous pants.

  • June Warren

    ““This is something we grew up into. That’s why they don’t tell us nothing about sagging. We gonna sag regardless. We ain’t disrespectful. That’s how we were raised,” he said.”

    De’Shawn Miller and many like him were probably taught to spit too. I’m so sick and tired of seeing thugs enter stores and literally spitting on the threshold. I guess that “ain’t disrespectful” either.

  • anthropologique

    We must hold the media accountable to journalistic integrity.

    We know it would have been a metaphysical impossibility for her to say “That’s how we were raised.”

    Review the tape. We know she said “Dat’s how we’s be raised.”

    And we approve of her Ebonics. Unless we charge the Africans a race tax for speaking our White English, we shouldn’t allow them to speak it at all. Ebonics is a step in the right direction for blacks who are struggling against Whitey, and the sooner they recover their full mastery of Edo and Congolese, the better. We want them to be more and more homesick.

  • the OTHER Shawn: (the female)

    DeShawn (oh, how I wish blacks had never heard of my name…)

    Anyhoo, DeShawn, dude, your saggy drawers AREN’T from how you were raised. You weren’t raised. You just got older. Oh, and you ARE disrespectful. You’re downright disgusting.

  • SF Paul

    As soon as this article appeared in the news I knew that it would quickly be labeled racist by ghetto dressing blacks. I wondered how many bus drivers will be assaulted for refusal to give black thugs a ride?

  • Anonymous

    What’s the big deal with saggy pants? If blacks want to walk around looking like such ridiculous fools, by all means let them. The fact that blacks don’t even have enough sense of decency or brains to know better is obvious. The very fact that a law is required to get blacks to dress properly says more about them then anything else could. But so what? I admit I don’t particularly like seeing ‘butt-crack’, but it makes flight difficult and has resulted in many arrests of black suspects. Lets just focus on helping out our own white community.

  • Crystal

    I wonder who these kids are dressing to impress? It is certainly not an employer because no employer in their right mind is going to hire a kid that shows up to apply for work dressed in baggy pants. I don’t think it is to impress the ladies because no woman wants to see a man’s underwear because his pants are too big. I personally think that they dress this way to impress each other.

  • mark

    “This is something we grew up into. That’s why they don’t tell us nothing about sagging. We gonna sag regardless. We ain’t disrespectful. That’s how we were raised,”

    It sounds like this black cretin should spend more time learning English than worrying about the latest fashion.

  • Anonymous

    @7 Anon,

    >>

    What’s the big deal with saggy pants? If blacks want to walk around looking like such ridiculous fools, by all means let them.

    >>

    Less than a day ago, I’m sitting in the library cafeteria and three kids in tee shirts long enough to be dresses covering (thankfully) the tops of pants whose crotch leveled out around their knees amble on by, utterly ruining my lunch.

    We can’t call blacks on this because that would be racis’.

    But these kids were white.

    >>

    The fact that blacks don’t even have enough sense of decency or brains to know better is obvious.

    >>

    White kid mature more slowly than blacks, taking longer (17-19) to fully develop that area of their brain which differentiates between fantasy and reality.

    Which means they are subject to mad inspiration from idiots for the same, extended, period.

    Without ‘equal representation’ from parents and adults who essentially ridicule the original culture’s dress mode for what it is, these kids have no counterweight to understand that this is not how _whites_ behave.

    Period.

  • Oximoronic

    How one was raised doen’t mean it is right. Maybe parents should consider raising children according to right and wrong, not stupid and stupider.

  • Peter K

    They should be banned. Blacks walk around like fools with their pants sagging below their butts and genitals. For one, that’s unsanitary when it comes to public transportation. Two, it’s indecent. If a man walked around in his underwear, wouldn’t he be ticketed at the least? So why do Blacks get away with walking around in their underwear? Because they have their pants around their knees? Does that make it less indecent?

  • Deirdre

    The irony of wearing these sagging pants is that the custom emerged in prison, a culture many black males have been exposed to on some level, be it from themselves or from a father, son, uncle, or brother. Prison culture dictated that lowered, sagging trousers be worn by men who were “spoken for” or “owned” by other, stronger men. They were essentially not to be touched as they belonged to another prisoner. I have heard it and also read it in the past. And now it has entered mainstream society, “courtesy” of black youth. Young men of all cultures can be seen with their drawers visible. Disgraceful. Will the gifts of the civil rights movement ever stop giving?

  • Anonymous

    13 — Deirdre wrote at 6:46 PM on June 4:

    Prison culture dictated that lowered, sagging trousers be worn by men who were “spoken for” or “owned” by other, stronger men. They were essentially not to be touched as they belonged to another prisoner

    I don’t doubt that the sagging pants esthetic (if that’s the word) came out of the (extensive) black prison experience. But I think your details are incorrect.

    You’re making the assumption that prisoners can choose their pants from among a range of sizes, like in a store. I believe that in prison you tell the authorities your clothing sizes, or they measure you, and then assign you whatever items are closest to your measurement from among whatever happens to be in stock. Sometimes the costume fits, sometimes it doesn’t. But it’s not like Inmate #475920 suddenly starts sporting baggier trousers just because, as of last night, he’s now the property of Inmate #419857. I’ve never been locked up myself, but to my knowledge, convicts don’t have that sort of wardrobe choice: they have to wear whatever Laundry happens to hand them. So I doubt any such “dress codes” of the sort that gay men observe in the bar scene, could practicably exist behind bars.

    Another sagging-pants-related tidbit from the Big House: the black fashion for not wearing a belt (which is also, of course, an aid to sagging) apparently came from the fact that prisoners aren’t allowed belts because they could hang themselves with them.

    Regardless, none of these details do anything to alter the main point of all this: that blacks — and ONLY blacks — are so base as to take their fashion cues from the incarcerated.

  • Anonymous

    A few years ago, I was driving through what was once my town. I spotted a group of black teenagers walking across the street. They were dressed fairly normally. They were wearing mostly blue jeans and football jackets, nothing too outlandish. Behind the group trailed one white teen. He was dressed up in every obnoxious “gangsta” stereotype you could think of….saggy pants, raiders jacket, etc. He looked ridiculous and the black teenagers looked embarrassed by his precense. What are white teenagers thinking when they do this? It looks ridiculous, and both blacks and whites find it offensive…especially blacks.

  • Spartan24

    To the person who mentioned bus drivers who refused entrance to persons whose pants were “sagging”- I would venture a guess that most of the drivers were black themselves. I would also imagine that the only people denied entrance to busses would be white kids who adopt that ridiculous black fashion.

  • Anonymous

    “DeShawn, dude, your saggy drawers AREN’T from how you were raised. You weren’t raised; you just got older.”

    –Other Shawn

    ……………….

    I think that says it all. That explains a lot in “black culture”.

    I personally am not offended or shocked at seeing their pretty polka-dot underwear (which they are so proud to show off). Actually, I find it downright hysterical. If only they could realize how ludicrous they are! I’m sure they would quickly cover up if they knew how I and many others are privately laughing at them.

    I say let fools be fools. You can’t legislate intelligence.

  • Anonymous

    15 — Anonymous wrote at 8:18 PM on June 4:

    A few years ago, I was driving through what was once my town. I spotted a group of black teenagers walking across the street. They were dressed fairly normally. They were wearing mostly blue jeans and football jackets, nothing too outlandish. Behind the group trailed one white teen. He was dressed up in every obnoxious “gangsta” stereotype you could think of….saggy pants, raiders jacket, etc. He looked ridiculous and the black teenagers looked embarrassed by his precense. What are white teenagers thinking when they do this? It looks ridiculous, and both blacks and whites find it offensive…especially blacks.————

    They were embarrassed by the White teens attire? I highly doubt that observation. They only “hate” that a White kid would try to emulate their “bruthas”…

    I have never seen any black find that kind of attire offensive when it is worn by blacks.

    BTW, it is only WHITES that find it offensive and disgusting whether worn by blacks or White kids. When I see a White kid dressed like that I stare them right in the face with an expression of “wake up, kid, YOU are better than some low life black “gangsta”. Or just say, “hey, I like your costume”

  • olewhitelady

    As to the origin of saggy pants as a fashion:

    I believe the craze started with the temporary confiscation of belts in jails, a place many ghetto dwellers spend time. Since these people believe arrest is a rite of passage, saggy pants are akin to a medal.

    What makes me sick is to see young white men wearing ghetto styles. Even pairs of shorts that cover the knees are a fashion that originated with baggy shorts that hung off the haunches, even if the former fit normally at the waist. And to see even small boys struggling around in wet, clinging swim trunks of this nature is downright ludicrous! Wearing ball caps backward or sideways is the same thing, as is donning dress-length tees. I realize that it may be difficult for males to find shorts now that are Bermuda-length, but, if I were a man or boy, I’d wear cut-offs instead–anything but ghetto styles.

  • Anonymous

    Blacks need to stop appropriating White culture. Whites started the saggy pants style. I saw it with my own eyes in the late 80’s – preppies with their Duckhead pants down around their hips. Meanwhile, blacks were wearing their pants normally.

  • Anonymous

    20 — Anonymous wrote at 9:39 AM on June 5:

    Blacks need to stop appropriating White culture. Whites started the saggy pants style. I saw it with my own eyes in the late 80’s – preppies with their Duckhead pants down around their hips. Meanwhile, blacks were wearing their pants normally.

    ——————————-

    Really? Please show these “preppies” showing their boxers and pants down to their knees….

  • Question Diversity

    The three theories I have heard on the genesis of the “saggy pants” fashion all come from prison culture:

    1. Prisoners aren’t allowed to have belts, and, as Poster 14 above said, sometimes they get stock prison clothes that are oversized and therefore “sag.” Those on the outside started sagging their pants to show “solidarity” with imprisoned relatives or friends, and it spread from there.

    2. Prisoners that sag are advertising their availability.

    3. Or they’re ganged up, and are daring other prisoners to rape them, the implication being that he’s untouchable.

    Now, which one is it? Is it a combination of two, or of all three? It will take a sociology grad student’s Ph.D. dissertation to find the answer. However, most young people (of all races) that sag do so not because they think it has anything to do with prison, they do it because they see everyone else doing it, and they think it’s “cool” or “the style.” However, “the style” must have had a genesis.

  • Lauren

    Y’all are forgetting Marky Mark. I think his inch of underwear, showing above reasonably well-fitted trousers, is what got the ball rolling.

    I think that the secret homosexual lusts of black adolescents for Marky Mark (and for all the Calvin Klein models who were doing the same thing) were the primary genesis of the fashion.

  • Anonymous

    Two things real quick :

    First :

    “We gonna sag regardless. We ain’t disrespectful. That’s how we were raised,” he said.””

    Knowing, I can assure you that the young man quoted here concluded his comment with “That’s how we was raised”, and not “That’s how we were raised.”

    Check out the slave narratives for a discussion about accuracy and truthfulness in characterizing African American speech patterns.

    Secondly: I could write at length and with great insight (a lot of which I wish I didn’t even have – kind of like: “I have firsthand experience of chemical warfare”).. about this topic.

    But please let me suffice it to say, for those of you seeing this, that the magazine you are reading now is one of the most important publications in the world today.

    The next time you’re at an airport, read through the Amren archives, you will understand the role the West played in shaping the modern world, in so many ways.

    Resist post-westernism !!

    Alas, I don’t have time right now to elaborate.

    Sincerely,

    – crimesofthetimes.com

  • Anonymous

    this might be a tad off the subject, but what’s up with white people who think it’s okay to wear pajamas (aka “lounge pants”) in public?! is that any better than the saggy pants/boxer shorts phenomena?!

  • kgb

    I believe the “saggy pants” look actually began as a result of incarceration. Criminal black youth would have to surrender their belts when they got arrested and put into holding cells so that they wouldn’t hang themselves (or strangle someone else). Naturally, they wore hand-me-downs that were two sizes too big, so they looked like tramps.

    But it was seen by a lot of idiotic white youth as a sign that those men could “survive in the joint,” and were therefore badass… as opposed to aimless and possibly retarded.

    As for Marky Mark, he was no doubt trying to portray that he had some “street cred” in order to attract white kids to his rap CDs.

  • Anonymous

    When I think of Fort Worth I think of cowboys, country music, pickup trucks, Smith & Wesson six shooters, and the like. Not misbehaved blacks with drooping pants. I would think blacks there would be on their best behavior (or else!).