US Resumes Deportations to Haiti

Jamaica Observer, April 18, 2011

Despite what has been described as a humanitarian crisis, the United States has started the second round of deportations to Haiti.

Immigration officials said that 19 Haitians, who had been convicted of crimes in the US, were sent back to the impoverished, French-speaking Caribbean country.

“US officials confirmed that they have received no assurances that the 19 individuals who were deported will be treated humanely upon their arrival in Haiti,” said the Washington-based Centre for Constitutional Rights, a civil rights advocacy group, after a conference call with immigration officials.

Friday’s deportation was the second since the devastating January 12 earthquake in Haiti last year that killed an estimated 300,000 people and left more than a million others homeless.

The US had halted deportations in the wake of the massive earthquake, but immigration officials announced in December that would resume deportations in January.

At least 27 Haitians were deported on January 20.

Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) officials said they plan to send 700 immigrants back to Haiti this year, ignoring the objections of human rights groups, which insist that the move is “equivalent to a death sentence”.

Barbara Gonzalez, an ICE spokeswoman, said those sent back were “criminal aliens”, who were convicted in US courts for various violations of the law. She said all have already served sentences in American prisons.

The Centre for Constitutional Rights and a number of immigration advocacy groups have condemned the latest round of deportations, calling on the Obama Administration to immediately “halt all removals to Haiti and the release of all Haitians being held with final orders of removal.

“The United States has an obligation not to deport anyone to death,” said the groups, which comprise the University of Miami School of Law Human Rights Clinic and Immigration Clinic, FANM/Haitian Women of Miami, Alternative Chance, and Florida Immigrant Advocacy Center.

“Our country must live up to its human rights commitments and immediately halt any and all deportations to Haiti,” they added.

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  • voter

    “ICE plans to send all of 700 Haitian criminals back to Haiti this year.”

    No problem! Don’t fret about them, all you Human Rights experts. I predict they won’t remain in Haiti for long.

    They found their way here once before, they’ll find their way back again. Or to some other white country. Canada, Europe, there are plenty of places that want to sympathize with their plight and shower them with benefits.

  • English Tony from NYC

    All this fuss about sending (sorry, “planning to send”) a few criminals back to the places from which they originated. ICE is just pretending to a kind of severity in deporting alien thugs in our midst that it does not routinely practice.

    I’ll only be heartened when annual alien deportations are in the millions. I hope and believe I will live to see that day.

  • 38specialady

    So, what does deporting illegal immigrants have to do with a humanitarian crisis? They are here illegally; send them back to their own country so they can fix the problems there, or become a part of the problem there, as they have become here. This is not their country; what part of “illegal” don’t they understand? The Haitians have learned well how to sit with their hands out, begging, instead of trying to do for themselves. Still living in a tent? Not me! There’s plenty of cinder blocks and roofing material laying around, I’m building me a house. The only wrong the U.S. has done is continue to send money and aid to people who have no ambition or desire to help themselves. Bleeding heart liberals have broken this country.

  • Anonymous

    “The United States has an obligation not to deport anyone to death,” said the groups, which comprise the University of Miami School of Law Human Rights Clinic and Immigration Clinic, FANM/Haitian Women of Miami, Alternative Chance, and Florida Immigrant Advocacy Center.

    “Our country must live up to its human rights commitments and immediately halt any and all deportations to Haiti,” they added.

    ————————————————————-

    Deport to “death”? Come on! The only ones facing death is the White race in America! Genocide through immigrant invasions!

    These are criminals who committed crimes here! How about American deaths at the hands of these “refugees”? Deport ALL of them and take their families and children with them.

    Human rights, you say? WHOSE human rights? Ours or theirs? We are going to have to pick one or the other.

    Next DEPORT ALL illegals in this country and all their families, including their anchor babies!

  • Seek

    These “legal clinics” are immersed in sentiment and bad law, most of all on immigration issues. Read Walter Olson’s new book.

  • Tom S.

    “The United States has an obligation not to deport anyone to death,” said the groups

    Okay then, we’ll just take down the names and addresses of all of you that want them to stay and distribute them to live with you and your families, and you being reponsible for all their expenses and doing the time for their crimes. Deal?

  • olewhitelady

    No one in Haiti is “treated humanely” unless he has enough money to bribe officials. The country is in such disarray–even more than usual–that little notice will probably be taken of the deportees’ arrival. And, if it is, these ex-cons may well have enough American money (which might be just a few bucks) to pay off the cops.

  • Anonymous

    7 — olewhitelady wrote at 8:58 AM on April 21:

    No one in Haiti is “treated humanely” unless he has enough money to bribe officials. The country is in such disarray—even more than usual—that little notice will probably be taken of the deportees’ arrival. And, if it is, these ex-cons may well have enough American money (which might be just a few bucks) to pay off the cops.

    —————————————————————–

    I could care less! What nonwhite country isn’t corrupt?

    It is the HAITIAN people themselves that MADE their country what it is! Don’t forget what they did to ALL the French, including women and children, in that country. Read up on it sometime, then cry some more crocodile tears.

    You cannot CIVILIZE these people! How long must we even try?

    Why would we want any of these 3rd world people here in the first place?

  • Anonymous

    Export is a good idea when it comes to aid as well as unwanteds.

    If you -get- someone dependent on you and they do something you don’t like, you can turn the tap on and off until they realize how ‘tight’ with you they really are in an environment where they have no other resources.

    At which time, turning the tap back on comes in the form of not just submission as gratitude but -acceptance- of things like sterilization and fixed economic class dispensations to keep the wealth from corrupting upwards.

    If you bring them here, and then release them like leopards on the rich streets, anything you do to intimidate, embarrass or aggravate them will reach a certain pain threshold beyond which they will say ‘forget you!’ and instead turn to the innocents whose midst they are in and ‘ask’ /them/ for help.

    I have no problem helping someone who is so stupid and/or lacking in work ethic motive, genetically, socially or otherwise, to get into a safe living environment, with food, _within their own lands_.

    We could do that.

    With white ‘aid workers’ (Hullo, Halliburton?) or with robots. Far cheaper than we can absorb them and educate them high enough to be useful members of society here.

    The difference is that liberals only feel good when they hurt others (of their own kind) and themselves as much if not more than the pain that their designated victim population is suffering.

    And that is why liberalism is a mental disease.

    It is sympathetic masochism standing in for ‘white guilt’.

  • Bonnie Blue Flag

    Analogy:

    What if a person robbed a bank or convenience store and took money that in no way belonged to them. Then, the robber was caught when he wrote a check to a doctor who was going to perform life-saving surgery on him. Does the doctor get to keep the money, and does the man get the life-saving surgery? Obviously not.

    When you take something that isn’t yours to begin with it is a moot argument to say that “taking it away” will lead to negative consequences. It can’t be “taken away” because in the eyes of the law it was never legally or legitimately owned by the theif/trespassor/invader to begin with.

  • Ben

    @9

    I agree with you.

    Altruism is a hallmark of Liberalism. Altruism is perfectly fine until it harms the person themselves or group/nation/etc that they belong too.

    It is like a scale.

    Helping Haitians in their own land by trade to boost their economy? Ok. I could maybe go along with that.

    Helping Haitians by sending free money and sending American aid to educate/vaccinate/etc? This is a “gray area.” By sending Americans they can be raped or get a disease. Sending free money that could help our own economy could be damaging, etc.

    Unwillingness to deport or execute Haitian criminals and allowing them to live in the United States because it makes you feel better as a “Human rights activist.” Bad. These are criminals and a nation that has become so pacified or altruist as to allow such things is a nation in decline.

    Allowing Haitians (or anyone in) with disease, thought to be eradicated in the western world, a good idea? Um. No.

    My altruism only goes as far as when it starts to be a harm to me or a nation in which I reside. Of course this is subjective (as provided), but the last ones are pretty indisputable. Criminals are criminals, period.