Rap Music Inspires Libyan Rebels to Defeat Gadhafi

Sebastian Abbot, WTOP-FM (Washington, D.C.), April 24, 2011

Libyan rebel fighter Jaad Jumaa Hashmi cranks up the volume on his pickup truck’s stereo when he heads into battle against Moammar Gadhafi’s forces.

He looks for inspiration from a growing cadre of amateur rappers whose powerful songs have helped define the revolution.

The music captures the anger and frustration young Libyans feel at decades of repressive rule under Gadhafi, driving the 27-year-old Hashmi forward even though the heavy machine gun bolted on the back of his truck–and other weapons in the rebel arsenal–are no match for Gadhafi’s heavy artillery.

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“Everyone has his own way of fighting, and my weapon is art,” said Faraway, a geology student, during a recent recording session in a small room on the fourth floor of an aging apartment building in downtown Benghazi. The room was equipped with little more than a microphone, stereo and computer.

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Faraway, who like many rappers in Benghazi is known by his nickname, “Dark Man,” and Madani, aka “Madani Lion,” form the core of Music Masters, but the composition of the group has changed over time. One of the rappers quit just after the uprising started because he feared being targeted by Gadhafi’s thugs, Madani said. The group recently added 24-year-old Rami Raki, aka “Ram Rak,” who grew up in Manchester, England.

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Roughly a dozen rap songs recorded since the start of the rebellion have been put on CDs with rebel-inspired album covers and are available for sale in downtown Benghazi. One cover has a drawing of fighters on a captured Gadhafi tank flying the rebel flag.

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Al-Briki, aka “SWAT,” works as a garbage man, and Winees, known as “A.Z.,” is a small-time businessman. Both have the tough-guy vibe of gangsta rappers and expressed admiration for Tupac Shakur, who was shot and killed in Las Vegas in 1996.

“He’s a real rapper. He’s a thug,” Winees said.

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  • voter

    All the more reason to be leery of supporting these rebels or getting involved in their tangled problems.

    We don’t know who they are or what they represent. They may be even worse than the Old Regime.

  • john

    It seems almost surreal that the liberal media is absolutely baffled as to why good old fashioned, spoiled, privileged and weak white males could have roundly whipped the Sadam Hussein regime while the strong, moral and righteous brown muslims are being crushed by Gadhafi’s regime. The same white males who have been the doormat for black America and the multicults somehow can accomplish with small numbers what the muslims can’t, even with massive numbers and air support. Now the excuse must be that muslims need rap music on their side. With rap music, they can conquer the world! If that doesn’t work, the next solution will be massive quantities of malt liqour.

  • Brave1 (SavetheWest)

    First off. This type of music can inspire a lot of down trodden misguided youth, of all ethnicities & races.With that being said, I’ve luistened to a lot of rap music back in the day. From the early ’90s to early ‘2000s I listened to more angry music than most people. By angry I mean gangster rap and hard metal and punk. It was more a rebellion thing than actually believing what I was hearing. I am not a social scientist or psychologist, but I’m pretty street savvy. I would have to say that a high percentage of blacks actually believe the message in this music. Just like most of them believe they will make millions playing football, baseball and basketball. Reality is a foreign concept to them. Apparently to these Arabs as well. But that is life in a 3rd world country. Disenchanted youth, poverty, anger, unemployment, lack of regard for authority. These things all add up to a jihadist in training. God help the West, because those who ruin errh… run the Western nations will not help at all.

  • Anonymous

    Rap glorifies racism, violence and abusing women. All very familiar to Libyan culture. Proud to be thugs and criminals.

  • flyingtiger

    If he played Mozart, he would have won the war by now. Rap is for losers!

  • Anonymous

    BLACKS and RAP celebrate the criminal lifestyle

    its disgusting

  • Anonymous

    This all sounds like something out of Mel Gibson’s THE ROAD WARRIOR. These are the idiots we are supporting? Be careful what you wish for.

  • JBB

    “Looks like the jig’s up for Gadhafi.”

    Gadzooks! Amren used the J-word. Is this a return to slavery and Jim Crow? We will all go to Hell for this! Thanks, Amren!

  • Michael C. Scott

    I doubt the jig is up for Ghadhaffy Duck. Unless NATO backs off on the airstrikes and the “no fly zone”, Tripoli will have a very difficult time winning. Unless NATO puts boots and armor on the ground, the rebels can’t take western Libya. NATO’s middle ground amounts to de-facto partition of Libya between Tripolitania under the Duck and Cyrenacia under the rebels.