Looks Like Anti-Immigration Fatigue? Could Be Good News, Que No?

Dennis Welch, Arizona Guardian (Phoenix), March 1, 2011

One year after passing the toughest immigration law in the country, some Republicans are getting tired of the fight. A group of GOP lawmakers in the Senate say the state should focus less on immigration and more on jobs and economic issues like the state budget. That same group now stands in the way of Senate President Russell Pearce and his latest effort to crack down on those illegally living in the country.

“It’s time for a timeout in Arizona on immigration bills,” Sen. John McComish said last week. “I think the emphasis on immigration bills in general is distracting.”

Like many Republicans at the Capitol last year, McComish was a supporter of Pearce’s tough immigration bill, now simply known as SB1070. But the leader of the Senate may not have the same support as last year, as McComish and other GOP lawmakers are showing signs of fatigue. {snip}

All of this has some GOP lawmakers thinking it’s time to hold off on the issue and start working on other areas that need attention, such as the state budget and job creation.

{snip}

There are several other Republicans in the Senate who share the concerns of both McComish and Reagan, which could make it tough for Pearce to get his immigration agenda through the Legislature year.

Sen. Frank Antenori said last week he’s not going to vote for the measure until there’s budget deal in place. {snip}

Also last week, Sens. Rich Crandall and Sylvia Allen both voted against Pearce’s latest proposal (SB1611) in committee.

{snip}

In addition, there are several other lawmakers who are not saying whether they support the bill, such as Sens. John Nelson, Don Shooter and Steve Yarbrough.

Taken together, Pearce doesn’t have the support right now to pass the bill. But Pearce says he’ll have the votes once it goes to a vote in the Senate. {snip}

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