Open Season on Our Black Officials

Chris Stevenson, Hudson Valley Press, April 21, 2010

By now we all know there won’t be any US Senate run for Harold Ford Jr., not in New York anyway. {snip} Ford also revealed in an op-ed he wrote to the New York Times, that party insiders tried to “bully” him out of the race, citing they were “nervous” and wanted change.

{snip}

I recall specific operations by the Federal Government to target black elected officials for probes. That’s right, what we see Paterson going through, is very similar to what black elected officials have been going through in major cities like Buffalo, Philadelphia, Detroit, DC. Years ago investigations by Mary A. Fischer, Joe Davidson and Michael Frisby disclosed multiple federal probes by government appointed pitbulls like Atty. General Richard Thornburgh and directed against Harold Ford Sr., Maynard Jackson, Thomas Figures and others. Thornburgh was a criminal investigator appointed by Reagan back in 1988-91. {snip}

According to “Project Censored” website, among the (http://www.projectcensored.org/top-stories/articles/25-black-elected-officials-targeted-by-law/) “Top 25 Censored Stories of 1998” was “The black elected officials that were targeted by law.” Understand this, the same people whose job description is to track criminals or criminal behavior, literally began investigating black officials for no other reason other than their skin color. It get’s worse. “Statistical evidence indicates that black elected officials tended to be investigated by law enforcement agencies at higher rates than white elected officials. According to the Washington-based Joint Center of Political and Economic Studies, in the past 25 years 70 members of Congress have faced criminal charges. Fifteen percent of those investigated have been minorities–four times their percentage in the legislative body.

PC quoted the Washington Post report that black elected officials were the target of investigations for corruption in 14 of the 465 political corruption cases launched between 1983 and 1998–a period in which blacks were just 3% of all office holders. GQ Magazine noted that between 1981-93 members of the Congressional Black Caucus were investigated or indicted: “For the number to be equal to white representatives, 204 of the 409 whites . . . would have been subjected to the same scrutiny during that time. . . . Yet according to the Justice Department figures, only 15 (whites) actually were.”

To break this down in terms of magnitude, it wasn’t criminal or political improprieties that attracted the feds to “harass” the black official. Their criteria was 1-The higher the office 2-The most outspoken 3-The greater the influence or power. Manifestation of these earned equal magnitude of harassment. Of course this is simply Dr. Frances Cress Welsing’s “Isis Papers” being acted out by members of the FBI and like-agencies. Fear of a black takeover, fear of black decision making, fear of black inferiority, fear of black crime, fear of black success, assigning character flaws to dark skin to contrast a myth of white skin, call it what you will. This fear and desperation actually cost one man his life.

{snip}

These plots were no-doubt sour grapes measures towards black elected officials of formerly high-profile racist cities. Despicable ideas by a select few in government meant to slow or halt the tide of black leadership in southern enclaves highly populated by black voters. {snip}

It seemed the best backlash against civil rights was scandal, and multiple attempts to bring down black Mayors, congressmen, etc. around the same time was certainly more than coincidence. {snip}

Operation Bowtye still extended–at least unofficially–to the numerous black officials and Cabinet members in the Clinton Administration; Cliff Wharton, Mike Espy, Jocelyn Elders, Hazel O’Leary, Alexis Herman and of course Ron Brown. {snip}

Topics:

Share This

We welcome comments that add information or perspective, and we encourage polite debate. If you log in with a social media account, your comment should appear immediately. If you prefer to remain anonymous, you may comment as a guest, using a name and an e-mail address of convenience. Your comment will be moderated.

Comments are closed.