No Getting Past Race in America

Investor’s Business Daily, September 1, 2009

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In an attempt to allay the concerns of some white voters, candidate Obama even said that “to wish away the resentments of white Americans, to label them as misguided or even racist, without recognizing they are grounded in legitimate concerns–this too widens the racial divide, and blocks the path to understanding.”

This election was going to be different, he said, “this time we want to talk about the men and women of every color and creed who serve together, and fight together, and bleed together under the same proud flag.”

The closest he came to suggesting that an Obama administration would mean a new army of civil rights lawyers at the Justice Department was one well-buried line about “enforcing our civil rights laws and ensuring fairness in our criminal justice system.”

If Rev. Wright had been named attorney general instead of Eric Holder, maybe he would try to hire 100 new predatory lawyers, instead of 50-something of them as Holder is planning.

The idea is still the same: America “is still irrevocably bound to a tragic past”–the very opposite of what the president said he believed about “the decency and generosity of the American people”–so we need the federal government to police our ingrained, intractable racism in every nook and cranny of society.

Holder, with the president’s blessing, will now set out to undo the Bush administration’s altogether proper emphasis on individual cases of obvious, intentional discrimination, and return the federal government to a 1970s race-war mentality.

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To the entrenched legal establishment of the federal government, racism is ever and always a one-way street–as well as a problem that never diminishes without the bullying of government lawyers. That is “a profoundly distorted view of this country,” and the president last year assured us that he did not subscribe to it.

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