Non-Citizen Voting: Is It in America’s Future?

Center for Immigration Studies, September 2008

In this contentious election season, one thing that’s taken for granted is that American citizens will be the ones choosing the next president.

But a new paper from the Center for Immigration Studies reveals a concerted effort gathering force to allow new immigrants to vote without becoming citizens. It is being mounted by an alliance of academics and law professors, local and state political leaders, and community and immigration activists.

In his paper, Allowing Non-Citizens to Vote in the United States? Why Not, Dr. Stanley Renshon offers the first comprehensive review and critique of this growing movement. Dr. Renshon, a professor of political science at City University of New York Graduate Center, warns that decoupling the legal standing to vote from American citizenship would be a mistake for both immigrants and their new homeland.

CIS will release this paper at a panel discussion on Monday, September 15, at 9:30 a.m., at the National Press Club, 14th & F streets. Commenting on Dr. Renshon’s paper will be Michael Barone, a senior writer for U.S. News & World Report and principal coauthor of The Almanac of American Politics, and John Fund, a reporter for he Wall Street Journal and author of Stealing Elections: How Voter Fraud Threatens Our Democracy.

What: Release of Allowing Non-Citizens to Vote in the United States? Why Not

Author:

Stanley Renshon, CUNY Graduate Center

Discussants:

Michael Barone, U.S. News & World Report

John Fund, The Wall Street Journal

Moderator:

Mark Krikorian, Center for Immigration Studies

When:

Monday, September 15, 9:30 a.m.

Where:

National Press Club, 14th & F streets, Murrow Room

RSVP:

Bryan Griffith, 202-466-8185, press@cis.org

[Editor’s Note: “Allowing Non-Citizens to Vote in the United States? Why Not,: by Stanley Renshon, can be read here.]

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