Davis Warns of a New Civil War With Southern States

Jerry Zremski, Buffalo News, August 25, 2008

Congressional candidate Jack Davis, in a speech earlier this year, warned that increasing immigration from Mexico could lead to a new civil war between northern states and Mexican-influenced Southern states that may want to secede from the United States.

“In the latter part of this century or the next, Mexicans will be a majority in many of the states and could therefore take control of the state government using the democratic process,” Davis said in the speech. “They could then secede from the United States, and then we might have another civil war.”

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“They have an allegiance to Mexico, where they were taught the U.S. fought an unjust war with Mexico and took this territory,” Davis said. “They believe the territory of these states belongs to Mexico.”

Davis did not name specific states that might be prone to succession.

But he appeared to be referring to Texas—which seceded from Mexico, briefly became an independent republic and then joined the United States—and the territories Mexico lost as a result of the Mexican-American War of 1846-48. California, Arizona, Nevada, Utah, New Mexico and much of Colorado were all once Mexican territory, only to become U. S. states after the war.

Asked this week about his speech, Davis said he no longer believed Southern states would be prone to leaving the union in order to assert Mexican control over what is now U.S. territory.

“I think they’ll do it without a civil war,” he said. “They’ll take control of the state governments and start voting themselves anything they want.”

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Meanwhile, a top official at the National Council of La Raza, the nation’s leading Hispanic organization, termed Davis’ comments “extremely offensive.”

“He’s feeding an environment of intolerance that doesn’t distinguish between legal and illegal immigrants,” said Clarissa Martinez, director of immigration and national campaigns for the organization. “He’s presenting our whole community as invaders—people who want to take over the country.”

In fact, Davis in his speech, said: “Our country has been invaded, occupied and settled by 10 million illegal aliens.”

Davis issued a statement Friday, trying to clarify his earlier comments.

“My remarks at the Center were designed to bring urgency to the conversation,” he said in the statement. “I believe passionately in protecting our homeland and securing our borders. If my language was hyperbolic, the danger it described certainly is not.”

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“I think building a double wall long the southern border is the least expensive long-term solution to maintaining the heritage of our fathers,” Davis said in the speech on YouTube.

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Congressional candidate Jack Davis responded to questions about his speech with this comment on Friday:

“We are a nation of immigrants, but we are also a nation of laws. The Bush immigration policy is a disaster and the American taxpayers are on the hook for it. “In my view, American immigration policy must:

“Secure our borders.

“Reduce the number of illegal aliens in our country.

“Require the people already here to learn English, pay taxes and get in line for citizenship at their own expense.

“It’s not practical to deport millions of people, but we can’t reward or encourage further illegal entry into the United States with special rights or privileges.

“Corporate greed creates the demand for cheap labor which draws immigrants from across our borders and hurts law-abiding American workers. {snip}

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“Our broken borders, unsecured ports, and lack of effective inspection and enforcement, jeopardize the prosperity and security of Americans every single day. Until we fix it, we are vulnerable to another attack like we had in 2001 or worse, and American workers and their families will continue to suffer.”

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