Judicial Watch Releases Border Patrol Report on Mexican Government Incursions into the United States for Fiscal Year 2006

Judicial Watch, n.d.

Judicial Watch, the public interest group that investigates and prosecutes government corruption, today released a U.S. Border Patrol report titled, “Mexican Government Incidents—2006 Fiscal Year Report,” obtained under the provisions of the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA). But for Judicial Watch’s September, 2007 FOIA request, this information would not have been made public. The report describes 29 confirmed incidents in 2006 along the U.S.- Mexican border involving Mexican military and/or law enforcement personnel, 17 of which involved armed Mexican government agents. Among the incidents cited:

MEXICAN MILITARY ENCOUNTER (ARMED/INTENTIONAL) EL PASO—FORT HANCOCK STATION—At 2 P.M. on January 3, 2006, [Troopers] attempted to apprehend three vehicles believed to be smuggling contraband on I-10…As the vehicles approached the border, [Troopers] stated that a Mexican Military Humvee armed with a .50 caliber weapon and several soldiers were seen assisting smugglers return to Mexico…Officers then noticed several armed subjects dressed in fatigue type clothing unload the contraband into the Humvee. These subjects set fire to the stalled vehicle before leaving the area…

MEXICAN POLICE INCURSION (ARMED/INTENTIONAL) TUCSON NOGALES STATION—On June 2, 2006, a Border Patrol Agent assigned to the Nogales, Arizona station encountered two Mexican Police Officers that had illegally entered into the U.S. one mile west of the Mariposa Port of Entry…the Mexican Police Officers ran back into Mexico when ordered [by Border Patrol] to remain for questioning.

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[Editor’s Note: A PDF copy of the DHS report “Mexican Government Incidents: 2006 Fiscal Year Report” can be read or downloaded here.]

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