Posted on October 11, 2005

Highway Sound Barriers as Border Fences?

Jon Dougherty, WorldNetDaily.com, Oct. 10

As discussion of erecting a security fence along U.S. borders with Mexico and Canada heats up, some analysts say it’s possible Washington could economically erect thousands of miles of barrier to keep out illegal aliens, smugglers and terrorists, for about half of what the Pentagon is spending a month to fight the war on terror.

The idea, they say, is to erect a structure similar to barrier walls built along highways to reduce sound. They are sturdy, tall, not easily scaled and, most attractively, affordable.

Plus, analysts say, a wall would dramatically reduce outside threats.

The Federal Highway Administration says most highway sound barriers are constructed of concrete or masonry block, range from 3-5 meters [9-16 feet] in height, and cost between $175 and $200 a square meter.

According to the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials, there are “more than 2,630 linear miles of sound barriers” along U.S. highways, constructed at a cost of some $1.4 billion.

By comparison, the Pentagon is spending about $3.9 billion a month in Iraq and Afghanistan, not counting rebuilding costs, the Associated Press has reported.

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