U.S. Baby Boomers More Likely to Identify as Conservative

Jeffrey M. Jones, Gallup, January 29, 2015

Older generations of Americans are much more likely to describe their political views as conservative than as liberal. This includes the large baby boom generation, of whom 44% identified as conservative and 21% as liberal last year. That 23-percentage-point conservative advantage is less than the 31-point edge for the older traditionalist generation, but greater than those for Generation Xers and millennials. In fact, millennials are about as likely to say they are liberal as to say they are conservative.

Generations

The results are based on aggregated data from 14 separate Gallup polls conducted in 2014, including interviews with more than 16,000 U.S. adults, aged 18 and older.

{snip}

Throughout the past two decades, the relative conservatism of each generation has been consistent, even as the members of each generation have aged. Those born before 1946 have been the most conservative generation in every year going back to 1994, based on the percentage of the generation identifying as conservative minus the percentage identifying as liberal. Baby boomers have been less conservative than traditionalists, but more conservative than Gen Xers and millennials each year since 1994, spanning the period when baby boomers moved from being in their 30s or 40s to now when they are in their 50s or 60s.

The consistency in the relative rank of the generations over time reflects the fairly constant ideological preferences of each generation. Net conservatism among traditionalists typically has been about 30 points, while the conservative edge among baby boomers has been about 20 points, and millennials have been close to even.

The ideological preferences of Gen Xers have varied a bit more over time, with the conservative advantage closer to 10 points in the 1990s and mostly in the mid-to-high teens since then. Since 2012, the conservative lead among this generation has shrunk, as there has been a slight drop in conservative identification (from 39% to 35%) and a slight increase in liberal identification (from 21% to 23%). This change has occurred about equally among the younger and older people in Generation X.

{snip}

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  • Luca

    Clearly the indoctrination and propaganda have had a devestating effect on our youth.

    • archer

      Even a so called liberal in the ’60’s was a conservative by today’s standards, JFK would be considered far to the right in many ways.

      • Bryce Armstrong

        No kidding, and so would Martin Luther King!!!!

        • Speedy Steve

          Bull$#!+, Marxist Lucifer Kaching was a communist through and through. He was also a puppet of the NYC fellow-traveler crowd. He was today’s demon-crat writ large — a useful idiot.

          • Bryce Armstrong

            I think we all learned a important leason here today, only YOU get to decide which dead liberal saint was secretly a conservative.

      • Good point. The definition of “liberal” and “conservative” has changed over the years.

        • WR_the_realist

          I changed from liberal to conservative simply by keeping the same views for 35 years. That’s true of a lot of other people as well.

      • Speedy Steve

        It must be time for a revival of the Dixie-crat Party.

      • Philnumber3

        Are you forgetting the radicals and revolutionaries of the 60s? People like Bill Ayers, Abbie Hoffman and Bernadette Dorhn who were totally anti-American then and remain so today but have become teachers/professors in some of the far left-wing universities? Not only did they do much damage to America in the 60s they continue to work against freedom and our democratic republic to this day, teaching the most malleable of all, children and young adults.

  • Easyrhino

    As the brown tidal wave from south of the border gets taller, “these Generation Xers and millennials” are beginning to see the end game in this upcoming disaster.

    That, and they can see that their chosen one (Obama) has turned out to be a complete racist fraud.

    • TomIron361

      racist fraud.
      _________________
      Yeah, I hate racist frauds. Be a proud racist and make no pretenses.

      • Bryce Armstrong

        Which is the reason why I loath the politically correct euphemism “race-realism”. I don’t need to hide behind such flowery speak, if anybody asks me if I’m racist, I say hell yah.

        • Yeah, I am racist. Just like 95% of the world’s people are.

  • connorhus

    Ya… Baby Boomers and the Greatest generation are all conservative as long as you don’t count their pensions, social security, medicaid/medicare, and whatever form of economic can kicking/robbing from the gen X’rs and Millennials they are getting from the government each month. They point at welfare, unemployment and EBT screaming as they double dip and take a teenager’s job but can’t look at the bloated government and make work jobs they handed to themselves for decades paid for on the backs of their children and grand children.

    We don’t need their brand of conservatism we need something a bit less hypocritical.

    • bilderbuster

      The Baby Boomers are the perfect example of how it only takes one really bad generation to destroy everything.
      We can also thank “The Greatest Generation” for raising the most spoiled brats on God’s green Earth.

      • DonReynolds

        It must be irresistible to assume that every Baby Boomer is a pot-smoking hippie socialist. They got much more press and tv news time, and Hollywood movies, but they were not the majority of that generation. I could easily characterize the young adults today as the Occupy movement, but that would be unfair as well.

        • bilderbuster

          That’s the common perception of Baby Boomers.
          I know that they aren’t all like that.

          • archer

            I never drew a gov. check other than unemployment insurance and when I was drafted. Most of my friends were in a trade of some kind including myself, there are those that welcomed gov. intervention in just about anything, but we all know how that turns out. They want us fighting among ourselves while they continue outsourcing jobs and giving crooked bankers and wall streeters bailouts. The real culprits reside in a place on the Potomac.

          • Sick of it

            Boomers don’t understand how anti-government a lot of the youth are today. How much less socialist we are when compared to boomers who demand things like Social Security, the warfare-welfare state.

          • Speedy Steve

            Perhaps, but not enough to turn fences into spears or run nooses through magnolia trees.

          • Sick of it

            You might be surprised.

      • THANK YOU! You are so right. The Baby Boomers grew up in the most prosperous time in this country’s history. They gradually handed it all away, giving it to inferior races. Now the millenials are left to deal with the results. “Thanks mom and dad.”

    • MekongDelta69

      You’re bitching about the wrong people (generally).

      We worked for decades for our pensions (for those that get them).

      We paid for decades for our Social Security (by force).

      Medicaid/Medicare were foisted on us by LBJ as part of his ‘Great Destroy America Society.’ We didn’t want it, but money was forcibly taken from our paychecks by the gummint.

      Most of us have never taken a dime in welfare (which was also foisted on this country, along with every other socialist plan enacted at the time).

      Personally, I’ve never taken a dime from anybody in my life.
      I studied for years to get my good paying, highly technical job.
      I wouldn’t accept welfare at gunpoint.

      You can correctly direct your bitching at FDR and LBJ.

      • connorhus

        Sorry but you need to do a bit of non-biased soul searching and research. Not saying that these programs were not foisted on you but the so called excuse that you paid into them doesn’t hold up to the fact that most babyboomers will receive far more back before they die than they ever paid in.

        If you are one of the few boomers who is reaping the benefits of your private pension then my hat is off to you and you are not part of the problem. However far too many public pension boomers also claim they don’t get public money and it simply isn’t true. Boomers are the direct recipients of the bloated government employee system and it is all being paid for by the labor of those who came after.

        • MekongDelta69

          “non-biased soul searching and research.”
          I’ve lived it.

          “so called excuse that you paid into them”
          “So-called excuses” weren’t forcibly taken from our paychecks. Money was.

          I don’t get a private pension. I’ve worked for every dime I’ve ever received – on the backs of no one.

          You are doing what’s called generalizing.

          That would be like me saying everyone your age is a brainwashed, indoctrinated, self-loathing, guilt-ridden, spineless, hypocritical White leftist – and that’s not true.

          • connorhus

            Call it generalizing all you wish but it is NOT the governments place to be funding pensions on the backs of the public. No matter how much a government employee worked for it. Retirement is an individual responsibility. The only exception that should be made is a combat disability imo.

            As I have said the boomers will receive far more from the socialist programs than they were ever forced to pay into it. They will eat up their own contributions and all those from us who have come after. So obviously someone is getting it from the backs of others now aren’t they?

          • MekongDelta69

            “The only exception that should be made is a combat disability imo”
            Good – then you’re paying for what I went through.

            Other than that, it’s not the government’s ‘place’ to do ANYTHING, other than protect us from enemies – foreign and domestic.
            You should have seen the ‘monstrous’ amount of money I used to get paid to do that 24/7/365. It wouldn’t have paid enough for you to buy a brand new whizz-bang laptop today.

            You’re welcome…

          • connorhus

            You think you have a corner market on having served in the military?

            You’re welcome for my service as well.

          • MekongDelta69

            Maybe. Maybe not. I’d ask who you were with and when, but it doesn’t matter. Anybody can say anything.

            I’ve said this scores of times since I’ve been on AmRen since they went interactive…
            There are only two other people on earth on AmRen who know me personally.
            One was/is a Teammate (Same Team, same Det., diff. Plt.)
            The other was in 2nd Force (Force Recon for non-jarheads). Same time. Same place.

            So if you were – thanks.
            And if you weren’t – pogue.

          • connorhus

            Well I got my DD-214 and the framed ribbons on the wall. I fail to see in all honesty what any of that has to do with the discussion at hand to be frank. Kinda feels like playing a race card in my opinion. It doesn’t lend any credibility to whether Boomers will be using more tax dollars from the various programs than they ever paid in but if you feel it helps your point of view, more power to ya I guess.

          • Speedy Steve

            I served 4 years in a navy boiler room. I learned 2 things: never work for anybody stupider than you, and 2: never work for the federal gubmint again. 2 is probably a corollary on 1, but just to be sure. I thought my officers to be more dangerous than the Soviets.

          • The Worlds Scapegoat

            “Other than that, it’s not the government’s ‘place’ to do ANYTHING, other than protect us from enemies – foreign and domestic.”

            It’s the governments job to protect us from the government?
            Boy, that sure worked out good; Hasn’t it.

            .

          • Sick of it

            Thus we younger folks cannot afford the families that their generation could. They are taking money from their own descendants, especially when they are dead set on staying in their own home until they die. Wasted money.

          • Screamin_Ruffed_Grouse

            You didn’t pay in. You got robbed. Your whole generation accepted this and made no attempt to change it. Now you’re saying it is my responsibility to subject myself and my family to robbery so you can get some of your money back. Sorry chief, but I didn’t rob you, and my generation owes you nothing.

        • Philnumber3

          How much interest should be due on money taken by force for over 40 years? The whole thing is a liberal Ponzi scheme, instituted at the barrel of a gun, like all tyrannies.

          • connorhus

            The first of the Boomers have already started collecting their pay ins and then some. Those who retired at 62 in 2007 and it has been mushrooming ever since. The last of the Boomers are going to be in the same boat as the X’rs and Millennials more than likely. Interest should be the least of anyone’s worries at this point. Just give everyone back what they paid in and call it a day.

            Or perhaps take a bit more out for the older payees since they got to live and use the glorious infrastructure and social benefits of the utopian dream longer .

      • archer

        Well said.

    • LexiconD1

      Guess you don’t know how those programs work? THEY PAID INTO THOSE PROGRAMS ALL THEIR WORKING LIVES. Our government was suppose to take the money and invest it, making THEM money, not use it to bankroll welfare and other entitlements people do NOT work for.

      I want the money I’m entitled to, back from the government when I’m a senior. I earned it.

      • connorhus

        All of us have been forced to pay into it but it’s pretty clear only the Babyboomers are going to get what they paid in plus all ours as well. I would be all for just paying everyone back what they paid in and calling it quits myself.

        • archer

          I’m collecting SS and still paying into it, because of all the slackers the gov. allows I doubt I will ever fully retire. Most people will never really get what’s owed to them because the money was spent on other things, right now there should be a surplus in SS not a huge deficit.

      • John Smith

        And most will reap more than they paid – a handout paid by their children and grandchildren.

        • LexiconD1

          ONLY because our government, instead of investing it and making money (interest, etc.), giving it to welfare deadbeats who’ve contribute nothing more than new mouths to be feed by the taxpayers.

          • John Smith

            And our bloated defense budget, including unnecessary wars.

          • Bryce Armstrong

            As opposed to the necessary ones ones, which apparently don’t cost anything.

          • John Smith

            Going into hock for what is unavoidable is different than for the pointless.

          • LexiconD1

            I’m don’t think the wars were ‘unnecessary’, but I do think we went after the wrong people/nation. But, Bush wasn’t about to go after Saudi Arabia, where most of the 911 assassins hailed from.

            I was against going to war with Afghanistan, and totally angry we attacked Iraq for no reason. All we did was make an unstable part of the world worse off, much worse off.

          • jviscont1

            but isn’t the point to shoot as many brown people as possible?

      • Screamin_Ruffed_Grouse

        You’re not paying in. None of us are. We are being robbed. None of us are entitled to the money of our descendants. If my generation is not the first to level this on our predecessors, I sincerely hope my childrens’ is.

    • archer

      Medicare and Medicaid are fairly new and were shoved down our throats, they are one of the main reasons medical help is so expensive along with giving millions of illegals and freeloaders free care. My first insurance policy in the early 70’s for myself with 100% coverage for hospitalization only cost me about $18.50 a month, you had to pay doctor visits which were cheaper than most co-pays today. If you talk to someone who bills out medicare etc. they will tell you about the extreme waste and fraud in the system. In short keep the gov. out of it, as the saying goes “if the gov. owned the Sahara desert they would be out of sand in five years”.

    • Bryce Armstrong

      There’s just as many of those type of conservatives here who support the well fare state. To them being white is reason enough to see that your always take care of. One of them went so far as to lambaste the Republicans over their “jihad” on Social(list) Security.

      • connorhus

        No argument from me on that score Bryce. If we were all honest the numbers of us who are living off government welfare is disgustingly surprising. Once you count in the bloated government positions, Federal, State and County, all the education positions, private companies that live only by the government contract, etc. etc. etc.

        The government mammary gland feeds more than we want to admit.

    • Philnumber3

      Great. Force people to join a Ponzi scheme then chastise them when they do. Social Security and Medicaid are paid for by those in it (for the most part) while the others are strictly socialist schemes to finance the truly lazy and un-American.

  • Daniel

    It”s worse when you take into account the substantial leftwards drift of conservatism. Most of these self identified conservatives are pro-gay, pro-pot libertines. They just don’t want to pay taxes, that’s the only difference.

    • DonReynolds

      Conservatives have not drifted to the Left. What you have observed is a host of people, who were never considered conservative, claim the label…..like Libertarians, Anarchists, and the Religious Right.

      • John Smith

        NeoCons are “former” liberals who believe in big govt. so long as it promotes corporate handouts and serves the interests of the military-industrial complex.

        • DonReynolds

          I am sorry I did not mention the NeoCons and you are absolutely correct.

          The RINOs would be a very small tribe, living in the outback, if it weren’t for the NeoCons…..many of whom are actually what we call “chickenhawks”.

          (They never tire of suggesting more and more foreign interventions for the US military, but never took the oath themselves.)

          • Bryce Armstrong

            So I guess that means we can agree this leaves out George W Bush right?

          • DonReynolds

            I opposed GW when he was governor of Texas and when he ran for president. There was nothing conservative about GW, or his attorney general (Alberto), or his handling of 9-11, or his housing bubble, or his constant cheerleading for another amnesty for illegal aliens. It used to take my breath when the Leftists screamed about how “conservative” Bush was. They have no idea.

          • Alexandra1973

            At one church I attended the preacher insisted on calling W a “man of God.”

            I left after a while. I didn’t wish to attend the Church of Bush. In fact I got accused of being a liberal for–wait for it–claiming Bush wasn’t really a conservative!

          • DonReynolds

            Bush was a Liberal (United) Methodist.

            My former boss insisted I was an “ultra liberal” because I did not agree with him that all homosexuals should be rounded up and shot on sight. Yes, he was the Christian version of the Taliban…..and yes, it is people like that who make conservatives seem like nazis.

  • propagandaoftruth

    I’m an X’er close to boomer, late child of traditionalists.

    What a long strange ideological trip it’s been.

    • bilderbuster

      Between the Boomers and the X’ers lies the dreaded “Woodstock Generation”.

      • JohnEngelman

        The Woodstock Generation are baby boomers. I doubt they all became supporters of the Tea Party.

        • Bryce Armstrong

          They became yuppies and voted for Ronald Reagan.

          • The Worlds Scapegoat

            “They became yuppies and voted for Ronald Reagan.”

            Who gave us our first taste of illegal amnesty, so that his Republican business owner friends could have cheap labor.

            .

  • connorhus

    Even though I bagged on Boomers in my other comment I would also point out that the boomer generation really needs to be divided into two groups. Those born in the very late 50’s and the early 60’s are usually much different from the ones born from 1940 (last part of the greatest generation) to about 1958. That last segment were the ones who rallied for the civil rights movement, allowed Feminism to go rampant and to this day pander to those groups while they consume more tax dollars than any other single group.

    And call themselves conservative.

    • IstvanIN

      I would divvy up the two baby boomer groups up as 1946-1955 and 1956-1963.

      • Yes, there is a big difference between late and early Boomers. The early ones tended to be more liberal. The late ones-like myself-were young enough to see the abuses in government programs and higher crime and social disorder.

  • dd121

    The real leftist propaganda didn’t start to rise in the schools till after the 1960s which is after most baby boomers were educated.

    • connorhus

      I have to disagree there. The boomers born in the late 40’s and early 50’s were all over the social movements and gave them the mass they needed. They may not have been the ones with political clout but they were buying the socialist/Feminist dogma as fast as it could be put out.

      • LHathaway

        I’m sure their leaders were saying it was all about being ‘fair’, and that women and people of color were ‘victims’. While their adversaries, weren’t sayin nuffin. Or saying literally that, “I didn’t do nuffins”. Actually that is still what they are saying today, they simply want fairness. And they are still ‘victims’.

        • DonReynolds

          There is nothing “fair” about insisting on lies. People are not equal, they are all different, and those differences make them all unique, and being unique…..they are valuable. The Leftists in this country are willing to trade freedom for equality. You cannot have both at the same time.

          • LHathaway

            They can certainly label it ‘freedom’.

      • DonReynolds

        I remember the Cold War years rather well, without being part of the loud minority of young people who bought into the Leftist politics (civil rights, anti-war, feminism, environmentalism)….all of which were already being argued and appearing in the courtrooms. Most people in school in the 1960s were not hippies of any sort, but we knew who they were and their viewpoints were tolerated in discussions, but not commonly supported.

  • bilderbuster

    What’s a conservative these days?
    According to the Neo-Cons on FOX Martin Luther King was a conservative.
    Mittens Romney is a right Winger to many “moderate” Republicans also.

    • Brady

      To be fair the MLK of the neocons is very different from the real MLK.

      • bilderbuster

        So you’re saying the Neo-Cons honestly believe in their mythical MLK that they promote?

        • This may come as a shock to most of you, but I’m not really human. When I arrived on this Earth in 1977, I wasn’t “born” in a human sense, I arrived here from the planet Fezelinegiblauten-45. The only reason I haven’t left yet is that I’m still trying to find a good mechanic to fix my UFO, the one with a 768-speed transmission; you have to double pop the clutch to go from 262nd to 263rd gear. I should have never let that salesman talk me into buying the Mazda flying saucer.

          But anyway, in my time here on Earth, I’ve come to learn a lot about these “humans.” One of those things is that those that are smart enough can rationalize anything, even outright lies, to fit their own agendas and make themselves feel better. One example of an “outright lie” is that Martin Luther King was ever any sort of “conservative,” neo or otherwise. I’ve even heard some whoppers that he was a “libertarian.”

    • Bryce Armstrong

      Well, Conservatives, Neo or not, claim JFK and Lincoln, all the while trashing patriots and heroes like Joe McCarthy.

  • MekongDelta69

    That year range for “Baby Boomers” (1946-1964) has been an artificial one for decades.

    “Baby Boomer” was originally meant to denote all the babies born when all the guys came home from WWII and before some of them went back over to Korea.

    “Baby Boomer” was originally ‘designated’ as from 1945 through 1950. Period.

    I ought to know. I was one of millions upon millions of kids who grew up when America was actually A-M-E-R-I-C-A, and all was right with the world.

    • John Smith

      The current education system is in overdrive to push them to the left.

    • Michael Robert Ryan

      Exactly. If you looked at a chart of the political views of the boomers when they were the same age the millenials’ are now, it would probably look just like the millennials’ does today.

      I wouldn’t read too much into this poll. Winston Churchill once famously quipped “show me a young man who’s a conservative and I’ll show you a man with no heart, show me an old man who’s a liberal and I’ll show you a man with no brain.”

    • Itooktheredpill

      As I have gotten older I have become markedly more conservative in my views. Thing is I am only 23. But life threw me a few curve balls in my college years that caused me to grow up a lot faster than my peers.

      Sometimes you have to hit rock bottom in order to change. In retrospect the pains I went through made me who I am today and saved me from a bleak future.

      • Good for you. I am glad you are growing up, a lot faster than I did. But, on a side note, for your own sake, don’t be bitter. You are too young for that. Peace.

      • Julius Caesar

        I reached the point where I am at today in my 3rd year of high school (though my views have been like they are now for as long as I can remember, I only came to embrace them at that time). I am currently 19 and in my 2nd year of college.

        • Itooktheredpill

          When I look back at my life I was more or less always a semi race realist from the start. Even when my understanding of genetics was very little it was always blatantly obvious that blacks where very different. Also I have always found racist humor to be pretty funny since I was little.

          I have NEVER been ashamed to be white. People who I encountered with white guilt over the years disgusted me. Complete and utter weirdos.

          However it was not until I left college that I started to realize just how much the government was hiding from us about race and how incredibly devious and unfair this was. Not to mention that this was a genuine threat and attack on white people world wide. At that point I started to get pretty pissed and here I am lol.

    • MBlanc46

      My wife says that in order to count as one of us (I’m ’46 and she’s ’50) you have to remember where you were and what you were doing when you heard that Kennedy had been shot. There’s much to recommend that view. On the other hand, I have two younger half brothers that were born in ’63 and ’65. There is a lot that we share generationally, but I am almost old enough to be their father.

  • Sick of it

    I notice that race was excluded from this poll. More non-whites have been born into the younger generations than whites. Also more foreigners, whether white or non-white. So yeah, the prepared replacement population tends to be liberal. What does that have to do with the rest of us?

    • Brady

      Blacks and mestizos are not liberal in the sense that white liberals are liberal. Their support for Democratic Party has a very different rationale.

      • Sick of it

        Actually, Mestizos tend to be liberal. Some blacks are literal Marxists, though admittedly there are black social conservatives.

        • As I have said “liberal” and “conservative” are overused terms. Only Whites are really liberal. Blacks and mestizos SUPPORT “liberal” candidates, but they are not really liberal. They are race realists.

  • Dave West

    The problem with many conservatives today is that to them, “taking back America,” means electing another PRO-IMMIGRATION, anti-socalized medicine, anti-abortion, Republican as president.

    • Bryce Armstrong

      That might just be the single bat sh*t insane thing ever posted on this website.

  • JohnEngelman

    If Congressional Republicans cut Social Security and Medicare benefits this will change in a hurry.

    • DonReynolds

      I hope they start with the Crazy Checks passed out to kids who misbehave in school (deliberately) to qualify as “disabled”. Then they can shut off the disability checks to drug addicts. I am sure you get the idea.

      • Drug-test anyone receiving any sort of tax-funded assistance.

        • Sick of it

          That would lead to disparate impact, of course.

        • TheMaskedUnit

          Empowering the state always ends up with armed men shaking down the elderly, the white, the male, …
          That’s why the “War on Terror” has made you safe from nuns.
          Secede, secure the new border and learn from the past diversity.

          • DonReynolds

            I like your direction, but when you get there you will find it necessary to defend the territory that remains.
            Yes, that means “empowering the state” to secure the new border.
            Government exists to enable us to do what we cannot do by ourselves.

        • DonReynolds

          Drug-testing is not enough. Need to act on that information, when it is obtained.

    • Social (In)Security is a Ponzi scheme and always has been. As you yourself once wrote here, a liberal social welfare system must eventually collapse if one invites the rest of the world over to enjoy the benefits.

      • JohnEngelman

        My statement stands. Most older Republicans depend on Social Security and Medicare for the necessities of life. They will vote against any politicians who cut it.

        You can talk about a “Ponzi Scheme.” I will point out that Ronald Reagan’s “Supply Side Economic” policies was always a scam. It was never possible to cut taxes, raise defense spending, and balance the budget by 1983, as he promised to do in his debate with President Carter, without slashing Social Security and Medicare payments.

        Ronald Reagan ever mentioned cutting Social Security and Medicare because he knew that if he touched either he would not be elected. Instead he talked about cutting “waste fraud and abuse,” while hinting broadly that all he needed to do was cut welfare programs for black folks.

        • The House of Representatives did that. As I have repeatedly told you, all spending bills must originate in the House. What grade did you get in middle-school civics?

          • JohnEngelman

            The way the budgetary process works is that the presidential administration creates a budget, and sends it to Congress. Congress adds and subtracts, and sends it back to the president, who can sign it or veto it.

            Regardless of what the Constitution says, the president initiates things.

            In one of his columns George Will said that if every one of Reagan’s budgets had been approved of in its entirety the increase in the national debt during the Reagan administration would have been only ten percent less than it was.

            The increase in the national debt happened because Reagan cut taxes and raised defense spending. It was not the Democrats who did that.

          • Reagan once wanted to recommission the aircraft carrier USS Oriskany. This could not have operated even the F/A-18 Hornet. It would have taken $350 million just to get her running again, and $500 million for a new flight deck, after which she could still not have operated modern aircraft. The F-8 Crusader had gone out of service a decade before.

            Ooops!

            Congress wasn’t “buying” that.

            Oriskany is now an artificial reef off Florida.

      • TheMaskedUnit

        It is not a Ponzi scheme and you could never pull it off. Ponzi schemes are voluntary. SS is forced on people by men with guns.

      • It’s even more annoying than that. As far as SS goes, if you separate the tax/funding system from the benefit system, neither one would have had a chance of being voted into law individually and discretely. But you put the two together, and it’s among the very most popular things the Federal government does.

        Before implementing a major new entitlement, think things through, take some time to get it right, and get buy-in from all across the political spectrum. For once you implement it, you won’t be able to change it as much as one iota without the roof caving in on you.

  • DonReynolds

    This poll is poppycock.
    What a Boomer knows as conservative is by no ways similar to what the younger generation thinks of as conservative.
    You want proof or an example? Why not both?
    Young people think Libertarian is conservative, but the viewpoints they tend to repeat are the Left Libertarian variation. They think the Occupy movement is conservative. They think it would be conservative to do away with government, and rules, and cops. Patriotism? Ask them about it sometime.
    It does no good to use the same label when there is little or no agreement over what that label actually means. Crap, every RINO in Washington thinks he is a conservative. The Religious Right even claims to be conservative.

    • Spikeygrrl

      Well that woke me up!

      IMHO, not only does the Religious Right consider itself conservative, it considers itself to be twice as conservative as everybody else! What woke me up was your statement (emphasis mine) that “The Religious Right even claims to be conservative.” This phrasing suggests that you consider that claim to be unwarranted. (Please tell me if I’m wrong.)

      As an atheist minarchist, I would love to hear your reasoning on why the Religious Right is NOT conservative. I’m just so sick of discussion after discussion both here and elsewhere foundering on the reef of “because the Bible.”

      • DonReynolds

        Thank you, Spikeygrrl.

        The Religious Right is not conservative in the least.
        They are reactionary.
        The central theme to conservatism is individual freedom, which the Religious Right stepped over decades ago.

        No person can claim to be in favor of individual freedom when they insist on doing the thinking for everyone else…..and that is exactly what happens when the Religious Right insists on having their way regarding prayer in public schools, Sunday blue laws, abortion and contraception, gay marriage, and the rest of the raft of social issues they claim as their own. Outside these social issues, the Religious Right has almost no interest in government or public affairs. I have seen them in the public arena for many years.

        What is interesting about nearly all of these social issues is the fact that the none of the Religious Right are compelled to do anything at all. Their opposition has nothing to do with anything the law requires them to do. Their passion exists in keeping everyone else from voluntarily doing what no one is required to do. (I can remember when they protested and picketed movies they did not approve of…..pornographic and otherwise…..but were not required to attend. Which is just another example of their contempt for individual liberty.)

        • Spikeygrrl

          Hmmm…I’ll have to mull over that one for a while.

          Right outta the box I’m unsure whether or not individual liberty is quite as central to conservatism as you claim. It IS central, however, to minarchism — sometimes aka “libertarianism” (a coinage I detest).

          Hence the need to mull. I don’t want to be the hammer to which everything looks like a nail.

          • DonReynolds

            I understand your annoyance with the term libertarian, but most of them put up with it because they dislike the old term…..anarchy, which many libertarians still support.

            Yes, individual liberty is central to both conservatives and libertarians, but there is an important difference. Libertarians reject coercion in all of its forms and to them government is all about coercion….whether it is the military or the police…..and they believe if they abolish the state, there will be no coercion and everyone can just be happy and peaceful and go about their business without taxes and regulations. They would say that people only have rights when there is no coercion.

            Conservatives know that rights do not exist undefended. Abolish the state and another agent of coercion will simply take its place….perhaps the church or a cult. There will always be those who refuse to abandon coercion, whether they are criminals, psychopaths, sociopaths, autocrats, or just greedy and impatient individuals. People are free when their rights are protected from those who do not admit or recognize those rights. There is no freedom without the law and there is no law without enforcement (coercion).

  • John Smith

    “Moderate” is a codeword for “half-assed liberal.”

  • IstvanIN

    I am a baby-boomer and have always considered myself a real liberal, albeit one “with common sense”. My family and friends consider me right-wing. People have different definitions of the terms liberal and conservative. Quite frankly I do not think someone with any brains can be “liberal” or “conservative” on all issues. That is how nations end up with one-party systems when the majority are in lock step with a single political viewpoint. I get rankled when people say “I am a Democrat”, as in “that is the way I vote no matter what”.

    What today we call liberals are really no different than Bolsheviks. They only allow one view point and terrorize those who disagree. That isn’t my idea of the modern, Western liberal society I want to live in. I want a society were we can debate issues intelligently without destroying the other guy because we don’t agree with him. I want a society where the representatives of the people actually represent the people of the US, where Senators look out for the states best interests and the President actually upholds the constitution and protects the citizens. And that means protecting everyone’s right to freedom of speech and expression, freedom of association and everyone’s basic civil rights.

    With a 85-90% White majority we were evolving towards the freest, most prosperous society on Earth. Where the majority behaved not because there was a cop on every corner but because we just did. And now it is almost over.

    You know something, you can only have freedom if people know how to conduct themselves when no one is watching, which is why third-world people need authoritarian regimes.

    • Itooktheredpill

      Sometimes I think what america could have been in 2100 with a population of 400-500 million that is 90% white. A global power for the ages.

      The best geopolitical position on the planet, a country the size of a continent populated with the smartest , most productive, and creative race on the planet.

      Alas instead we are giving away our country without firing a shot, and have doomed the future of america to being the next brazil.

      • Sick of it

        Too many of the best and brightest have no kids, have only one kid, or have kids with idiots. Things will have to change dramatically if we are to survive to 2100. Just survive.

        • Itooktheredpill

          Thats one of the things I find most disconcerting is that the average american seems to get dumber with each generation.

          Another thing I would point out is that americans have become strongly accustomed to feeling very safe and more or less invincible.

          The kind of “Merica” and “Will kick your ass” mentality. This arrogance causes most americans to be blind to the fact that their country is being invaded before their very eyes.

          We are so used to having praise heaped upon us as being “The best country” in the world that most americans cant even imagine losing their country.

          America has only been around for 239 years. Thats really not long at all in comparison to most other countries. It can disappear and end up being something future generations only hear about in history books.

          • Ella

            The country America will be here, but it will not be the same faces and will look more like Latin cultures. Infrastructure and society will slowly decay but will not entirely “die.”

    • John Jackson

      In all fairness most on the right are unwilling to have any civil debate either. Dare to question foreign policy or Israel and immediately you “Hate America” and are an anti-semite.

    • MBlanc46

      These ancient binaries–liberal vs. conservative, Left vs. Right–have long outlived any usefulness they might once have had. If you want to describe your political views, you should state the end you lean toward on a number of axes. For example, I describe my politics as pluralist, localist, populist, anti-statist, and anti-capitalist. Some of those descriptors are more associated with what’s called the Right, and others with the Left.

  • It seems that people with property that they have worked for decades to earn become somewhat conservative about money. Golly, gee! Next in the news: “Dog Chases Cat.”

  • I don’t believe these stats one second. First, they don’t break down the millennial generation by race. “Baby Boomers” are overwhelmingly White. When they were born, we were an 80% or more White country, and Whites had almost as many kids as non-Whites. But the millenials are the least White generation. Barely half of them, I would suspect, are White. Actually, I am surprised they are as conservative as they are. Also, let’s face it: People DO become more conservative as they age. So, OF COURSE Baby Boomers are a little further to the right. As you get older, you see, the “peace, love, harmony and understanding” is not how the world really works. Also if you are White, you have had more opportunity to be around non-Whites. That would make most White people become more “conservative.” This article really proves nothing.

    “You have to be heartless not to be a liberal at 20, and brainless to still be a liberal at 40.”

    • Ella

      They cling to their multicult religion with hopes to receive free monies.

  • Alexandra1973

    Generation X here. Used to have fairly liberal leanings, but I’ve since learned.

    • Mary

      I’m also Generation X. I’ve never exactly been a full-fledged liberal, but I used to hold more liberal views in general than I do now. I voted for Clinton in my first presidential election in 1992, having just turned 18. I’ve been a race realist since elementary school, however, due to early and negative exposure to “diversity.”

      • Alexandra1973

        My mother’s a baby boomer and she leans to the left. Though she’s getting sick and tired of gays being so in-your-face about their activities.

        • MBlanc46

          Good for Mom. Even better if she has the temerity to say so in public.

    • Cindy

      Me too!

  • The Worlds Scapegoat

    “U.S. Baby Boomers More Likely to Identify as Conservative”

    Considering that there is no difference between modern day conservatives and liberals, that statement is irrelevant.

  • Cobbett

    Conservative as in what exactly…low taxes and small government? What is ‘conservative’ about that?

    • Spikeygrrl

      What ISN’T conservative about minarchy (inter alia, low taxes and small government)?

      • Cobbett

        I though it was called ‘libertarian’….not that I’m either anyway.

        • Spikeygrrl

          Pure libertarians see no need for government at all. Read pretty much anything by Murray Rothbard.

          Minarchists do see a need for government — a VERY small one, the powers of which are few and extremely limited. Also known as “the night watchman state.” Read Nozick’s Anarchy, State, and Utopia.

          For fiction along these lines, you can’t go too far wrong with Heinlein or Rand.

          Enjoy!

          • That was my position when I was a manager: “Ask only me for those things which only I can do.”

    • MBlanc46

      It’s certainly conservative in the contemporary sense of the term. It’s also conservative in the sense of conserving the republic that the founders created and which functioned until at least 1860.

      • Cobbett

        Well, it’s not conservative in the real sense of the world…bourgeois individualism is what it is.

  • Speedy Steve

    Conservatives who dig defense contracts, an all-volunteer military, homo weddings and child sacrifice are usually called neocons. No wonder our gubmint is what the late Sam Francis called anarcho-tyranny.

    • Spikeygrrl

      What in your view is objectionable about our volunteer Armed Forces? You would perhaps prefer a return to the draft…?

      • Speedy Steve

        National service would keep a lot of immigrants away, and it would provide some much needed discipline to our home grown, stroppy, fatherless riff-raff.

        • Spikeygrrl

          You didn’t answer my question: What do you think is wrong with our volunteers?

          Now you’ve got two questions to answer. Here’s the 2nd one: Would you REALLY want the guy who’s got your back under heavy fire in Wutdaphukistan to be there because somebody forced him to?

          • Speedy Steve

            Your question was not only rhetorical in nature but also completely unnecessary. I never said anything was wrong with our all-volunteer military; that was an assumption on your part. But if you’ve read 1984 by George Orwell, then you’d remember that the eternal war for eternal peace was fought by volunteers. Politicians might be a little more careful when their sons and daughters become cannon fodder. Yes, I do favor a draft. For men only. It would keep the ladies out of combat.

          • Spikeygrrl

            Please allow me to refresh your memory:
            “Conservatives who dig an all-volunteer military, homo weddings and child sacrifice are usually called neocons.” Your words, not mine.

            By including voluntary military in your list of odious practices (“child sacrifices.” REALLY?!) you clearly conveyed your disaproval.

            My question was in no way rhetorical, and so I ask you yet again: What do you think is wrong with our voluntary military?

            Full disclosure: My husband is a military medical career NCO (remember “corpse man”? That’s him) who trains and deploys with Marines. Because of him and all his brothers and sisters in arms — and in scrubs 😉 — a far higher proportion of wounded sevicemembers return to us alive, and recover more fully, than in any other armed conflict in U.S. history. Hence yer darn tootin’ I’m serious about my question…but let me rephrase it: if YOU just got your leg blown off by an IED, would you want the “Doc” slapping on a tourniquet and carrying you out of the line of fire to be there because somebody forced him to be?

            Don’t be a coward (our military volunteers aren’t, and you’re SOOOOO much better than they are), just answer the dam’ question already!

        • I think the draft was counter-productive when the US had it. Would you really want to share a foxhole with someone who would shirk, screw up, use drugs, or try to run away?

          The whole concept of national service usually has loopholes. In Europe, the cowards were given the alternative choice of community service, which meant living at their mothers’ homes and “teaching” at schools or pretending to “work” at hospitals. When I was a mercenary, I wasn’t too fond of heavy shelling, and especially not of rocket artillery. There are no ranging shots with rockets; the whole area gets plastered. When we were cut off and had to fight our way out, it meant a lot of “work”. Inside concrete buildings, I preferred Hungarian stick-grenades and a tomahawk, though I kept my rifle. During our escape, I set a lot of land mines. My favorite was two anti-tank mines, one atop the other, with a “Do Not Disturb” trip in one of the secondary fuze wells, with an anti-personnel mine buried on top of them. We were on the flanks, and the last thing we wanted was anyone getting around us. A point man blown into a thin, red mist is a discouragement to pursuit. That even throws what’s left of a truck high into the trees.

          Nobody really belongs in that sort of $#!&-hole, but N’DeShitavious would be as worthless for that as he would be for “teachin’ da babies” in an alternative, sissy form of national service. Ten years later, I was ruled “criminally insane” by a federal judge. After three years in a prison-hospital, the feds gave me a free, but mandatory head-shrinker for another three years. The child abuse when I was little would have done that, anyway, so if I was PTSD, it wasn’t Croatia. I wouldn’t wish my dreams each night, 23 years later on N’DeShitavious, but he wouldn’t be able to function at the front at all, let alone afterward.

          Not everyone can take it. One of my best friends growing up wanted to be a navy submarine officer, and was a engineer on a boomer. He had to spend three-month cruises underwater, and couldn’t do that forever: medical discharge. It was the shells and rockets that did me; he said it turned me mean. The wounds weren’t exactly terrible. My gripe about him was when he started talking to me like an officer; I don’t exactly hate officers, but I don’t want one as a friend, either.

          What we are thus looking at is again a racial disconnect, with social aspects. I wouldn’t fight alongside N’DeShitavious unless Little Green Men From Outer Space invaded, and probably not even then. The officers can go hang themselves as well.

  • Americaandthewestshouldbewhite

    The semites pushed for accepting of all deviant behavior as normal and also accpeting all cultures and giving them prominence over Western Christian culture while they extoll their own semitic culture. No wonder out youth are all messed up.

  • corvinus

    Hint: nonwhites are nearly half of all Millennials, but only about a quarter of the Boomers.

    But of course, the study won’t take race into account.