‘Candid Camera’ for Our Times

Michael McGregor, American Renaissance, April 7, 2014

The brainwashing of middle Americans.

In America, television has become our cultural glue, one of the few things nearly everyone shares. However, it is not a neutral zone where Americans can relax after work; it is ground zero for the liberal cultural offensive. And “offensive” is the best word to describe the new “reality” show What Would You Do?

This is a hidden-camera program in which actors create awkward situations in public to see how people react. At the official website for the series, “racism” is the top category the program explores. Here are samples of scenes acted out in the presence of unsuspecting bystanders:

This is what happens when actors put on the scene with the interracial couple: A young, pretty blonde woman meets her parents in a diner to show off her well-dressed, articulate black boyfriend and tell them they want to get married. The father loudly opposes marriage to a black man. Customers then step up nobly to tell the father he’s wrong: “What does color have to do with anything?”

Everyone who intervenes is white—but all customers in the diner appear to be white.

Even before the program begins, the introduction explains how any right-thinking American is supposed to act:

What would you do if you witnessed an interracial couple telling both sets of parents that they intended to get married, and instead of hearing a loving, joyful reception, you heard clear bigotry?

Another program is introduced in ominous tones. “What would you do if you saw a mother and daughter confronted by intolerance?”

The scene unfolds with two Mexican women speaking Spanish in a restaurant. A white man at another table tells them that this is America and that they should speak English. Other white customers defend the Spanish-speakers, and the TV crew that has been filming the program then comes out to congratulate them. One of them says “I’m an American and she’s an American too,” pointing to the mother.

Like most What Would You Do? episodes, this one piggybacks on current events. It was staged shortly after a few basketball fans took to Twitter to complain that the NBA chose a young Mexican boy in a mariachi outfit to sing the National Anthem during the championship. What Would You Do? host John Quinones (who, despite being a seventh-generation American, grew up in a Spanish-only household) had the boy on the program to ask what he says to people “with such hatred in their hearts?”

John Quinones

John Quinones

In another episode, a Muslim woman in a hijab is refused service at a coffee shop because the waiter thinks she could be a potential terrorist. Luckily for her, a father of a soldier comes to her rescue and goes after the café racists. A few patrons support the waiter, but the narrator criticizes them, and a member of the crew sticks a camera in their faces to grill them about why the support “intolerance.”

Other top targets of the program are “homophobia” and “weight issues.” What Would You Do? attacks any attempt to enforce the standards of previous generations.

Most of the program’s “good Samaritans” are Middle Americans, and it is clearly aimed at the heartland. It tries to convey to ordinary Americans what the proper code of conduct should be. If you think miscegenation is wrong, you’re a bigot. If you think Hispanic immigrants out to learn English, you’re a bigot.  If you think a muslim in a hijab might be a terrorist, you’re a bigot.

Part of the insidious nature of the program is that the behavior of the villains is so crude that it is hard for any sensible person to defend them. The viewer ends up wanting to cheer on the bystanders who are standing up for diversity and tolerance.

We all know that television is not just entertainment; it is indoctrination. What Would You Do? is blatant indoctrination.

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Michael McGregor
Mr. McGregor writes for Radix Journal.
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