Anti-Trump Violence Sweeps the Nation

Matthew Vadum, LifeZette, October 26, 2016

While the mainstream media has been working day and night promoting Hillary Clinton’s candidacy, it has largely ignored or downplayed violent attacks against supporters of Donald Trump.

But assaults on Trump supporters appear to be growing increasingly common as Election Day approaches and tensions intensify. Reports of Trump lawn signs and banners being stolen and defaced are everywhere on social media.

Making matters worse, undercover video evidence emerged showing senior Democrat operatives Robert Creamer and Scott Foval acknowledging using dirty, likely illegal tricks against the Trump campaign. Their goal was to generate negative media coverage of Trump rallies by fomenting violence at them. The media eagerly used the various fisticuffs and melees the Democrats created to attempt to discredit Trump by depicting his supporters as violent, knuckle-dragging crazies.

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Despite their aversion to covering stories that put Trump in a sympathetic light, members of the media had no choice but to cover the extremely newsworthy Oct. 15 weekend firebombing of Republican Party headquarters in Orange County, North Carolina. Gov. Pat McCrory called the arson “an attack on our democracy,” while one GOP official called it an act of “political terrorism.” Spray-painted on the building next door were a swastika and the sentence “Nazi Republicans get out of town or else.”

Meanwhile, most physical attacks on Trump supporters make only  local news outlet–if that. Rarely do such assaults get mentioned on the evening TV broadcast news or in The New York Times or The Washington Post. That’s because they don’t fit the leftist narrative that Republicans are violent, racist, Islamophobic homophobes.

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Here is a compilation of some of the attacks on Trump supporters:

On Oct. 15 in Bangor, Maine, vandals spray-painted about 20 parked cars outside a Trump rally. Trump supporter Paul Foster, whose van was hit with white paint, told reporters, “Why can’t they do a peaceful protest instead of painting cars, all of this, to make their statement?”

Around Oct. 3, a couple of Trump supporters were assaulted in Zeitgeist, a San Francisco bar, after they were allegedly refused service for expressing support for Trump, GotNews reports. “The two Trump supporters were attacked, punched, and chased into the street by ‘some thugs’ that a barmaid called out from the back.” Lilian Kim of ABC 7 Bay Area tweeted a photo of the men, in which one was wearing a Trump T-shirt and the other was wearing a “Blue Lives Matter” shirt.

On Sept. 28 in El Cajon, California, an angry mob at a Black Lives Matter protest beat 21-year-old Trump supporter Feras Jabro for wearing a “Make America Great Again” baseball cap. The assault was broadcast live using the smartphone app Periscope.

On Sept. 26 at Gustavus Adolphus College in St. Peter, Minnesota, as the first presidential debate was about to get underway, a woman wearing Trump campaign apparel was assaulted while heading to a debate watch event. {snip}

On Aug. 19 in Minneapolis, Minnesota, Trump supporters had to run a gauntlet of angry protesters to get into a Trump fundraiser at the Minneapolis Convention Center. When they left after the event they were hit, pushed, and spit on.

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On Aug. 3 in Bloomfield, New Jersey, an assailant attacked a 62-year-old man who was walking down the street wearing a pro-Trump T-shirt, local police said. “The motorist inquired why [the man] was wearing the shirt, directing profanities at him,” a police spokesman said. “The [victim] continued to walk away as [the] motorist followed him.” The motorist hit the man several times with a crowbar, causing injuries to his arms, hands, and thighs,

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This is not an exhaustive list of violent attacks on Trump supporters.

No doubt there will be plenty more such assaults in the final two weeks, as Americans head to the polls.

And Hillary Clinton’s campaign may be involved in those attacks.

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