In Egypt, Rockville Man Witnesses Attack on Coptic Christians

Susan Singer-Bart, Gazette, October 26, 2011

Harry Malek attended a church service in Cairo, Egypt, the morning of Oct. 9, then watched on TV in the afternoon as police attacked worshippers marching from the church to a television station.

The Coptic Christians were protesting the burning of a church in southern Egypt 10 days earlier and the treatment of the Christian minority since February, when President Hosni Mubarak’s government fell.

The estimated 6,000 marchers were shocked when police fired at them with live ammunition and ran them over with tanks, Malek said. The official death toll is 24. Malek suspects the toll is higher.

Egyptian military officials explained the action to the New York Times by saying soldiers were terrified of the thousands of demonstrators.

{snip}

Malek’s second trip to Egypt since June, this was intended to be a family visit. He was invited by the new Egyptian government in June as part of a delegation of Copts who met with the government to discuss the future of the Christian minority.

“We are part of the Coptic Solidarity,” he said.

The Coptic Church, the major Christian church of Egypt, Ethiopia and the Middle East, split in the fifth century from what would become the Orthodox and Roman Catholic churches.

Coptic Solidarity was formed in 2009 by Copts in the U.S., Europe and Canada to support members of the church in Egypt. {snip}

“We ask that they not apply Islamic law to Christians,” Malek said.

They also asked the government to liberalize rules that make building new churches difficult.

Christians, primarily Copts, make up about 10 percent of Egypt’s population of 85 million. The New York Times reports more than 93,000 Christians have left the country since the revolution.

{snip}

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  • The g Factor

    We must have been deluded to think the Arab Spring would lead to better human rights in the Middle East – things could actually get much worse. Remember ‘rights’ are a Western idea and the idea doesn’t seem to transplant too well in the Third World.

  • Anonymous

    “The New York Times reports more than 93,000 Christians have left the country since the revolution.”

    Let’s not allow more of them here. The Lebanese Christians leave a bad taste wherever they go in the West.

    As a racialist, I make a point of not recognizing religion. The people of North Africa and the Middle East are Arabs, and only Arabs.

    Religion should not matter to our sympathies.

  • Zach Sowers

    It’s time to cut their foreign aid from Uncle Sucker.

  • ghw

    Wny woud the Egyptian government be wanting to “discuss the furure of the Christian minority”?

    It the community’s future in question?

    This sounds ominous to me!

  • Anonymous

    And Christians in Iraq are faring even worse, thank to Bush the Younger (idiot).

  • Anonymous

    The ‘Arab Spring’ has turned into the Islamist winter.

  • jdavis

    Is sharia law inclusive in its’ diversity for Christianity? So why would anyone ever be so ill informed as to advocate this Arab Spring?

    Oh, that same group running the world has a bigger plan…I see.

  • Rebelcelt

    Christians, primarily Copts, make up about 10 percent of Egypt’s population of 85 million. The New York Times reports more than 93,000 Christians have left the country since the revolution.

    Let’s see what percentage they are in 5 years…i bet lower than 10%. Any takers?

  • Patterson

    @ 8 — Rebelcelt, who wrote “The New York Times reports more than 93,000 Christians have left the country since the revolution.”

    Bigger question: where are they going? If you like the Armenians in Los Angeles you’re gonna love the Copts in New Jersey…

  • cpascal

    If a Christian country attacked Muslims this way and burned down a mosque, the Muslim world would be crying about racism and intolerance. Yet this is how they treat Christians in their own countries. In some Muslim countries, Christian churches, Bibles, crosses, and the like are completely outlawed.

  • jack in Chicago

    The worst part of this story:

    “The New York Times reports more than 93,000 Christians have left the country since the revolution.”

    They are not going to other Arab countries – yes comparisons with Armenian “Christians” moving to California are accurate and in places where the Coptic Egyptian Christians manage to do OK as merchants, international import/export traders with their connections abroad – all sorts of American “Conservatives” will try to argue that -see, 3rd world immigration isn’t all that bad – these folks are “Christians” and share lots of our values and then it works out that 193,000 other types of Arabs who look like these Egyptian Coptic Christians manage to get in to Australia, Canada, New Jersey and we get lots of rapes of Western women who don’t conform to Islamic dress.

  • Anonymous

    2 — Anonymous wrote at 9:04 PM on October 27:

    “Let’s not allow more of them here. The Lebanese Christians leave a bad taste wherever they go in the West.”

    I’ll remember that the next time I think of Danny Thomas, Tony Shalhoub, Casey Kasem, Paul Anka, Jamie Farr, Helen Thomas, Joseph Aoun (President of Northeastern U.), Paul Orfalea (founder of Kinko’s), John Zogby, Gen. George Joulwan (ret.), James Jabara (1st. American jet ace in history), Elias Corey (Nobel Prize-winner in Chemistry), Charles Elachi (Director of Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, CA), to name a few. They are/were ALL Lebanese Christians.

    That being said, I concur with you that religious sympathies should not play a part in deciding immigration policy. We already have way too many people living in this overcrowded country. Let’s kick a lot of them out, starting with the illegals. Anyone allowed in afterwards should be someone who can add something meaningful to the mix, like a mathematician, scientist, engineer, etc.