Ugandan School Found Using Bomb as Bell

Reuters Africa, July 4, 2011

A mine awareness team in Uganda were horrified to find an unexploded bomb being used as a bell when they visited a school to teach children how to spot bombs, a local newspaper reported.

The Anti-Mine Network organisation saw teachers banging the bomb with stones to call children to lessons in a 700-pupil school in a rural area, the Daily Monitor said.

“Its head was still active, which means that if it is hit by a stronger force, it would explode instantly and cause untold destruction in the area,” Wilson Bwambale, coordinator of the organisation, told the newspaper.

{snip}

This is the second bomb that the Anti-Mine Network have found in a Ugandan school in the last six months. Another was found being used by children at lunchtime as a toy and put away in a storeroom during lessons.

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  • Tim in Indiana

    This is not just a different “culture;” it’s a whole ‘nother, alien (to Western sensitivities) level of primitiveness.

    I guess using bombs as playthings is just an example of how the “developing” world is actually developing.

  • Anonymous

    Mind boggling. This means that the teachers and/or principal found an unidentified metal object and didn’t bother to find out what it was…before installing it as the school bell. Keep in mind, these are some of the more educated adults in Uganda!

    And yet Stephen Hawking is still officially scouring Africa looking for his untapped “African Geniuses”. Not so brilliant, Dr. Hawking.

  • Anonymous

    It’s not like such a thing is an isolated incident:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1wAtCmC6F2M

  • Anonymous

    When I was very young,(8 or 9 maybe) I remember thinking that the black children were not as smart as the slowest of my white classmates. This story is only one of thousands (including things I’ve witnessed personally) that confirms that.

  • Cliff Yablonski

    IQ And The Wealth Of Nations lists Ugandans as having an average IQ of 73. An IQ of 70 or less is considered retarded, or what used to be called moron.

    So half of all Ugandans are moderate to profoundly mentally challenged. The other half are just very stupid.

  • elitist

    I have to ask myself how old I was when I already knew better than to use unexploded ordinance as playthings.

    Around 7, I think.

    And I didn’t live in a war-torn country where “bomb squad awareness groups” roved the countryside explaining the dangers to people.

    It is likely that by objective criteria, the average black African, has a mental age of between 7 and 10.

    And yet all of our grandiose plans for Africa (for Haiti, for African-Americans) are based on the assumption that they are “exactly as intelligent as whites and Asians.”

    Stories like the above will be rationalized away, of course – along with those about how Africans refuse to use trains, don’t distinguish between sewers and drinking water supplies, and will not cut grass to store for animal feed during the dry season because it would “offend the gods.”

    Speaking as a former crazy liberal, I would have to argue that the formula is as follows:

    because blacks are so profoundly and utterly different from us, the only “the” solution is all-out, blanket denial of reality – soon it will be the next generations problem anyway.

  • john

    In defense of the Ugandans, in a war-torn country, which Uganda certainly is, people inevitably become pretty casual about being around all sorts of ordnance, from rifles, handguns, all manner of automatic weapons, and even unexploded bombs and shells.

    Somehow I find the Ugandan attitude preferable to the terrified hysterics our schools go into at the sight of a water pistol.

  • Michael C. Scott

    Another article (July 4, 2011 Yahoo News) about this described “an unsuspecting teacher keeping a hand grenade in one of the classrooms.”

    Just what did this “unsuspecting” teacher think the hand grenade was? It’s a bit difficult to mistake a hand grenade for something else! They all look like… well… hand grenades.

  • Anonymous

    Actually, there is a mine website, ‘Ordata’ I believe, which includes diagrams, descriptions (bands, stencils etc.) and where possible, photos, to help even novices identify suspect UXO.

    They cover Russian, Chinese, German, American, French and English weapons, ranging from aerial bombs and rockets to submunitions as well as true mines.

    Of course the first thing that ALL of these pages say is: “If you see something like this, don’t touch it, call your local EOD authority immediately for assistance!”

    Now, the question is if they have WWW. connectivity in Uganda and can suitably manipulate Wiki to make use of the full resource.

  • Anonymous

    7 — john wrote at 12:46 PM on July 8:

    In defense of the Ugandans, in a war-torn country, which Uganda certainly is, people inevitably become pretty casual about being around all sorts of ordnance, from rifles, handguns, all manner of automatic weapons, and even unexploded bombs and shells.

    Somehow I find the Ugandan attitude preferable to the terrified hysterics our schools go into at the sight of a water pistol.

    —————–

    We are “terrified” of water pistols because browns and blacks have made a police state mandatory; that is, since cops, politicians and teacher’s won’t get to the root of the problem (black/ brown violence/ stupidity), everybody is treated the same, and a swiss army knife or a spork is a weapon.

    BUT: defending Ugandans’ sub- retarded attitudes and practices regarding BOMBS?

    SEVEN- HUNDRED POUND BOMBS? For Cripe’s sake, man, a seven hundred pound bomb would level a block, and vaporize that whole school.

    Ya’ might want to rethink your stance.

    As an important adjunct, I wouldn’t feel safe if you were near me and fireworks. Or a gun. Or maybe even a butterknife. Bombs aren’t toys.

  • Jack

    To Anon 10:

    It was a mortar and was not 700 pounds, there were supposedly 700 students.

    A 4.2 inch mortar would only have around 4 KG of comp B, a 120MM somewhat more, nowhere near enough to level a town.

    “Its head was still active, which means that if it is hit by a stronger force, it would explode instantly and cause untold destruction in the area,” Wilson Bwambale, coordinator of the organisation, told the newspaper.

    Shows how much hope they have. This knucklehead that is supposed to be experienced at identifying ordnance is ignorant.

    “Its head…” You mean fuze?

    “…if it is hit by a stronger force,…” Stronger than what?

    There are various types of mortars and fuzes, not all are point detonating and not all are high explosive.

    What type of fuze, was the safety wire removed?

    What type of ammunition?

    Was this fired ordinance (fired out of tube with non-actuating fuze) or unfired?

    Since he displays his ordnance ignorance, how do we know it’s “head” was still “active?”

    If you don’t know just say you don’t know instead of making stuff up you moron.

    Disclosure:

    Former MOS 55D20, Explosive Ordnance Disposal specialist, recently changed to 89D.

  • Whitey Bulger

    I would have given them a sledge hammer to ring the ‘bell’ louder. OK, I’m kidding.

  • Californian

    Somehow I find the Ugandan attitude preferable to the terrified hysterics our schools go into at the sight of a water pistol.

    Good point!