Farmers Tie Labor Shortage to State’s New Immigration Law, Ask for Help

Jeremy Redmon, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, May 26, 2011

Migrant farmworkers are bypassing Georgia because of the state’s tough new immigration enforcement law, creating a severe labor shortage among fruit and vegetable growers here and potentially putting hundreds of millions of dollars in crops in jeopardy, agricultural industry leaders said this week.

{snip}

Charles Hall, executive director of the Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association, said he has been in close contact with Labor Commissioner Mark Butler and Agricultural Commissioner Gary Black about the shortage, calling it the most severe he has seen. Hall said it’s possible state officials could hold job fairs to steer some of Georgia’s unemployed workers to these farm jobs, which pay $12.50 an hour on average. The state’s unemployment rate is now at 9.9 percent.

Farmers, however, say they often have little luck recruiting Georgia residents to work in their fields because it is temporary, hot and physically demanding. To recruit more workers, some farmers are offering signing bonuses, Hall said.

The law doesn’t take effect until July 1 but is already making migrant Hispanic farmworkers skittish, said Dick Minor, a partner with Minor Brothers Farm in Leslie in southwest Georgia who says he is missing about 50 of his workers now, threatening as much as a third of his crops.

{snip}

This month, Gov. Nathan Deal signed House Bill 87 into law. Among other things, the law punishes people who transport or harbor illegal immigrants here. It also authorizes police to investigate the immigration status of suspects they believe have committed state or federal crimes and who cannot produce identification, such as a driver’s license, or provide other information that could help police identify them.

{snip}

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  • Anonymous

    There are already millions and millions of Mexican farm workers in the U.S. The problem is that they did not stay on the farm and were moved into jobs more in the mainstream. The claim that we still need farm workers from Mexico or anywhere is a lie.

  • Stephen

    $12.50 an hour is really not a very good wage these days; better would be at least $18.00. When my uncle went to California in the early fifties he earned enough at picking lettuce to ” rent a nice apartment for himself and buy a good used car ” and to live all right. Not prosperous, but definitely lower middle class.

    Nowadays produce pickers in the fields earn very little in proportion to what they made fifty years ago – and the price of produce fifty years ago was not unusually high back then either.

    Given the temporary nature of the work and the need to move from place to place to take part in picking different kinds of produce as they ripen, it is not economical to work picking produce for lt what it pays. The low wages would all go for gasoline, hotel rent, motor vehicle maintenance, and take out food. It’s like going to work as a new hire mail carrier at the Post Office – every dime is spent staying employed with nothing left over. Except the Post Office eventually becomes a paying job after a two or three years, if you can last – while produce picking never becomes a good job no matter how long you work it.

  • Anonymous

    Robotics. I keep saying that the key lies in robotics. As long as you have a huge induction of goverment-dependent hispanics and a black minority with equally high rates of welfare dependence, you have to be able to assign salary equivalents as social credits.

    Rather than waste 380 billion dollars on a fighter jet we don’t need, we should look at advanced, anthropomorphic, _stoop labor capable_ robotics as the next step in rapidly reallocateable work force.

    This will only get worse as the nation ‘browns’ and whites refuse to do anything that supports a government they perceive as being hostile to their interests.

    Robotics are simple and cheap and easy to engineer. As long as they stay in the human strength range, they can use cable drives and pneumatic as an alternative to onboard hydraulic systems to mimic the human biomechanical system. Stance and locomotion can be -added-, from an initial tracked or wheeled configuration and you can apply mission-change by armature attachments that carry a knowledge base ‘from the elbow down’.

    Drive them to the worksite, limit their recognition field to 20 objects and the ontological topology problem is ALSO SIMPLE.

    That we don’t invest in this, as an alternative to becoming another wage slave labor state like China (hello Hispanics, wake up!) is the surest sign, IMO, that our elites hate not just us but -every- class beneath them. We are just sheerable sheep to them.

  • Kingoldby

    Calamity! Farmers are forced to hire Americans and to pay better wages and provide better conditions.

    If we are not careful this might result in blue collar workers getting a better standard of living.

  • WR the elder

    Unemployment in the U.S. exceeds 10% and I doubt it’s much lower in Georgia. So I don’t need to hear any bull about a labor shortage. It is true that farmers might have to raise their wages to get legal labor, and it will no doubt be a shock to them to have to pay wages that American citizens actually are able to live on. Well, boo hoo.

  • Anonymous

    Supply and demand. If the prices of apples double but my taxes go down 50% because I am no longer paying SSI disability for millions of illegals well.. I’ll take it.

  • Anonymous

    Americans won’t do the jobs for one third the pay!

    Invaders pay no withholding, no income taxes, no health care taxes….

    When Americans get to renege on 1/3 of the taxes, then those $7 an hour jobs become much more do-able.

    The “authorities” make sure no one can do these jobs at the taxes imposed. Invaders, however, pay none of these taxes (because for them it’s all done in cash). So an honest man getting $7 can’t make it when he ultimately gets $4. Give him, like the Invader, the full $7 and it’s a living wage again!

  • Anonymous

    Here’s an idea….take down the “whites need not apply” signs.

    And how much would it cost to pay a living wage ten times what an illegal makes? Two extra cents an orange? Three? That’s what we are talking about.

  • Anonymous

    2 — Stephen wrote at 4:40 PM on May 27:

    $12.50 an hour is really not a very good wage these days; better would be at least $18.00. When my uncle went to California in the early fifties he earned enough at picking lettuce to ” rent a nice apartment for himself and buy a good used car ” and to live all right. Not prosperous, but definitely lower middle class.

    Nowadays produce pickers in the fields earn very little in proportion to what they made fifty years ago – and the price of produce fifty years ago was not unusually high back then either.

    ————————————————————

    Really? $12.50 is not a good wage? These people are Illegals. They shouldn’t be earning a dime. Haven’t you heard they rent houses and apartments and pile in 10 or more and “split” the rent? Pretty darn cheap rent for each one, isn’t it? They also get section 8 or haven’t you heard about that yet? Taking section 8 monies from our elderly and disabled who have much less to live on! They also get food stamps, free medical, and anything else you can think of that they take from us.

    Your whole post is an absolute misguided “boo hoo” rant for these farmworkers! We all worked the fields when I was young and so did our parents for pennies on a dollar. We were poor. There was no crying over or all the media attention of all us “okies” who worked in horrid conditions compared to these illegals. We also paid taxes! No tears and welfare, or free medical for us White folks.

    BTW, yes produce was high back then compared to what we made in wages! We went to packing houses and collected the damaged fruit etc, that they threw away! We had our own little gardens, our fruit trees in our back yards. We canned our jellies and fruit. We made dinner from scratch. We didn’t have TV dinners and all the frozen stuff of today nor fast food joints. Do you really think these illegals do what we did back then? No.

  • Just a thought

    Here’s what I think – Why don’t Amreners or an organization such as Amren or similar reach out to agriculture industry/farmers unions, most of whom must be White as of now anyway, debate and explain why it’s good to have such a law and how the issue of labor shortage can be remedied through increase in wages.

    Simultaneously reach out to like-minded local media outlets, bloggers, radio hosts such as the one who interviewed Jared Taylor and have these issues discussed.

    The point is take up small actionable items and try to see them through to fruition. With a White majority if such things can’t be done now, they can’t be done ever ! And farming community is one of the Whitest still, so if they can’t be convinced collectively , nobody else can be.

    It’s nice to have a forum to share ideas, news, discuss issues that matter but it’s more important to devise a strategy to take up grassroots level action & achieve results.

  • Len

    There is no labor shortage , just folks on welfare who refuse to work.

  • BannerRWB

    7-Anon, as well as many other posters on this and similar ariticles are correct. If farmers had to pay the workers health care, standard housing, all taxes, etc. there would be plenty of Whites willing to do this work. The cost of produce would increase, but the cost in taxes for everyone would (or should) be similarly reduced to the point of balance. We would then have less unemployment, less welfare, less immigration, less crime, and on and on. I understand there would have to be some trade off between free trade and restrictive tarriffs, but there just must be a better way to run a country than how we are doing it now.

  • sbuffalonative

    If they truly are legitimate migrant farm workers, why should they be concerned about an anti-illegal alien law? Unless, they’re not legitimate migrant workers but in fact illegal aliens hoping to illegally settle in in the United States.

  • Vito Danelli

    As I understand, there are already Temporary Work Visa programs specifically for Agricultural Workers. I think the problem with these visa for the Farmer Owners is that there are strict requirements in terms of providing pay, housing, etc. In other words, it’s just soooo much cheaper to pay low wages in cash with no benefits.

    http://travel.state.gov/visa/temp/types/types_1271.html

    H-2A Seasonal Agricultural Workers – Review USCIS H-2A program requirements and regulations, which apply to all petitions filed for this visa category. NOTE: USCIS may approve a petition for this visa category on your behalf if you are a citizen or national of a designated country. If you are a citizen or national from a non-designated country, USCIS may approve a petition on your behalf if it is determined to be in the United States’ interest. Learn more from USCIS;

    H-2B Temporary or Seasonal Nonagricultural Workers – Review USCIS H-2B program requirements and regulations, which apply to all petitions filed for this visa category. NOTE: USCIS may approve a petition for this visa category on your behalf if you are a citizen or national of a designated country. If you are a citizen or national from a non-designated country, USCIS may approve a petition on your behalf if it is determined to be in the United States’ interest. Learn more from USCIS. (66,000);

  • REGVLVS

    “$12.50 an hour is really not a very good wage these days”

    Is that a joke, Stephen? As a young man in NJ I want to make it very clear that $12.50 is a GREAT wage. Most of the jobs around here open to people without a college diploma pay between $8 and $10, with typical raises of around 7 cents per year. Note that nearly all workplaces that hire Americans (most ethnic businesses don’t) require a high school diploma or GED which is essential even for the most basic jobs requiring almost no thought whatsoever. College degrees are generally necessary for any kind of management position, even ones as low as a supervisor at a supermarket, for those without pre-existing “management experience”.

    Mexicans are getting paid more then Americans for lower-skill jobs, and that says a whole lot.

  • Wild Bill

    The unemployed whites WILL NOT WORK BECAUSE THEY ARE GETTING DISABILITY & UNEMPLOYMENT payments from the government that are equal to or greater than the wages proposed.

    Why should they work for less money when they can stay at home?

    The whites that go out looking for a job are only doing it to keep their unemployment benefits.

  • Anonymous

    Farm work pays alot better than I thought it did and $12.50 is well above the minimum wage. I understand the job is temporary which is probably why that 9.9 percent unemployed doesn’t want to do it but why not make people work for their welfare? Why can’t this be one of the jobs these people have to do to get that deposit on their EBT card? Also, there’s a huge teen unemployment rate out there and unless the farmers are reserving these jobs for swarthy people that don’t speak English I don’t understand why they aren’t taking them. There are also 50,000 convicts in GA prisons that could be put out to toil in the fields.

  • Anonymous

    “potentially putting hundreds of millions of dollars in crops in jeopardy” – if there are “hundreds of millions of dollars” of crops to be picked, then surely they can afford to pay white people a living wage, rather than the SLAVE wages they pay the illegal immigrants…

  • Jack in Chicago

    I hope everyone here understands what is going on here.

    This is the Neo Slave economic power. Like the original Black slavery system, White slave owners insist that economic prosperity has to have endless numbers of NW slaves because native born (White) Americans will just not do certain jobs and demand too high wages – plus, the NW slaves are supposed to be happy with the situation because the slaves are housed and fed and the slaves lives are better here in America as compared to where they came from (Black African then, Mexico and Central America now).

    These corrupt White slave owners are always thinking the short term – the next harvest, never the long term. And in the long term slave economies, slavery social systems always break down, their are always slave revolts like the famous Sparticus slave rebellion in Rome, the Haitian slave revolt that slaughtered all the Whites in Haiti – the cultural Marxism of the 1960s between the “haves” and the “have nots” – only the “haves” getting killed and terrorized in these modern day slave revolts are poor and working class Whites.

    I know Amren readers are frustrated, looking for enemies to lash out against. Please identify the Neo Slave owners like Charles Hall, executive director of the Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association.

    And for God’s sake don’t listen to any of their libertarian economic nonsense.

  • Dave

    How about going to a local church that is willing to do at least some of the work for a 12.50 per hour donation.

    How about getting some lighting and doing the work in the evening when it’s cooler.

    The point I’m making is that there are a lot of solutions to this “problem” yet the media acts like it’s doomsday if we don’t have these illegal workers.

    As most everyone has pointed out here it’s about money. What I notice about America these days is that whenever social policies that affect supply and demand favor the common working American the media and politicians act as though the sky is falling, yet media pundits portray themselves as people that care about the “common good”. It’s reaching the stage of grotesque.

  • John Engelman

    If American employers offered decent wages, benefits, and working conditions, they would find plenty of American employees.

  • Anonymous

    Because of the transient nature of farming, the fact that people only work maybe 5 months out of the year planting and harvesting, there will always be labor shortages and a shortage of Americans wanting to the work. The solution I think is to make farming a year round occupation. Why can’t farmers switch to greenhouses in the fall and winter and grow crops all year round? Why can’t they also grow crops like pineapples, cocoa beans, coffee, sugar cane, bananas and every other item we have to import? They could also have customers come in right off the street and buy this produce without having to go through a middle man and they can pick what they need and pay for it. The farmer can sell the produce cheaper and still make more money in the end.

  • Anonymous

    Harvest work takes some training and experience.

    It’s not a walk-on part because you cannot trample some plants and you have to know where to cut individual stems and which to reject so that bad produce doesn’t get mixed in with the good. It is hot, it is demanding, there are snakes and there are accidents.

    What’s more it is very much a time-domain driven work tasking because you risk spoilage as well as inefficient (time as money) allocation of labor force to different sized fields if you don’t keep to a given pace.

    Think something like what you see with a fast bagger at your local grocery store checkout lane, only bent at the waist and moving forward a couple feet with each plant harvested.

    Mexicans are very good at this. They have generations of experience at it.

    And so, particularly given our generally poor physical conditioning, it’s not likely that whites could simply replace them ‘if we were paid enough’.

    None of which matters. Because if the work has to be done, it doesn’t matter how it gets done, only that it is.

    If you want to get rid of the problematic population that comes with the jobskill set, you have to get rid of the job opening altogether.

    Robots make that happen. And when they are not doing stoop labor in agro, they can be used in housing construction and roadwork. i.e. They are the -opposite- of a specialist labor force. They are generic. Useful year round. And paid only in maintenance fees.

    Which is why they are critically necessary to a post-USA America. Where we will be desperately short of everything, including willing manual laborists.

    If you want to stay white, remain an innovative tool maker…

  • Anonymous

    Not a labor shortage, but a CHEAP labor shortage. Didn’t the state of Georgia do enough harm to itself (and the country) by earlier having the cheapest of labor – slavery? Some people just never learn.

  • William

    The impact of illegal labour bypassing Georgia is probably being over hyped at the momment. Cheap illegal Mexican labour has simply thwarted investment in fairly simple harvesting automation and the kind of business or cooperatives that would rent it out. We have plenty of examples of the Japanese substituting inventivness for labour and ending up with a cheaper more satisfactory result and even a case of Brazil out competing the USA in producing oranges due to superior Brazilian automation.

    As an engineer I also see the problem being that factory/farm managment becomes mentally lazy and stagnent. The kind of person that becomes a manager in this environment is the kind that prefers not to think too much perhaps more inclined to say bully down wages. They become unable to think out of the box and have one solution to everything: a race to the bottom in cheap labour. It is in everyone’s interest to move sway from the mentaility this labour creates.

    Sam Francis pointed this out 7 years ago:

    http://www.vdare.com/francis/economic_logic.htm

  • Anonymous

    Just raise the wages and hire Americans. I’d be glad to pay an extra twenty cents for my canned tomatoes, if that will solve the illegal alien problem.

  • Lauren

    #22, I grew up on a (large) farm, and so can maybe answer your questions. I realize that farming is presented in the Media, in ways totally divorced from reality, and so it is not your fault that you are unaware. Those dairies supplying the milk for the Ice Cream in the commercials don’t really send pretty teenage girls down to the river with the Cows, to give them baths. And the rest of the portrayals of farm life are just as absurd.

    American farmers, in limited numbers, do all the things you suggest. However, those things are unlikely to ever be practical on a large scale, because they fall within the category we call EASIER SAID THAN DONE.

    Farming is a very difficult thing to DO. It is even more difficult to do profitably. The men in my family worked themselves to death…putting in unreal hours, managing huge cash flows…often going into the red, even in years when there were bumper crops (using 100% American labor, BTW). American Agriculture is astonishingly efficient, and does not need suggestions from outsiders.

    Back to the absurd portrayals of farm life: My favorite was a movie made during an Ag Crisis…I forget which one… 80s, maybe… Anyway, the family had just sold their Grandmothers’ Quilts, all their jars of Homemade Jam…trying to scrap together money to pay the Taxes. But the next scene shows them coming home from the tax-paying, having stopped at the Grocery…unloading Paper Towels (a luxury item, you don’t buy, when you’re rolling Pennies to pay the taxes). In other words, Hollywood has no clue what it’s like to be a Farmer. Nor do Politicians.

    And as for $12.50 as a wage: Assuming year round employment, hat’s enough for a single person to buy a decent home in a Working Class neighborhood, in most rural communities. A couple pulling down that kind of pay can buy a rather nice rural home.

  • Anonymous

    Since when do we need illegals (specificially, illegal nonwhites) to do the same jobs whites (and blacks) were doing for years? Such a lie, and the sad thing is lots of Americans eat it up.

  • Greg

    The fix is a several step process.

    1. end corporate tax

    2. end welfare

    3. end the 15% employeer’s/employee’s pay for SS (that is the employee’s $)

  • Anonymous

    9 — Anonymous wrote at 8:57 PM on May 27:

    2 — Stephen wrote at 4:40 PM on May 27:

    “$12.50 an hour is really not a very good wage these days; better would be at least $18.00. When my uncle went to California in the early fifties he earned enough at picking lettuce to ” rent a nice apartment for himself and buy a good used car ” and to live all right. Not prosperous, but definitely lower middle class.

    Nowadays produce pickers in the fields earn very little in proportion to what they made fifty years ago – and the price of produce fifty years ago was not unusually high back then either.

    ——————————————————————————————

    Really? $12.50 is not a good wage? These people are Illegals. They shouldn’t be earning a dime. Haven’t you heard they rent houses and apartments and pile in 10 or more and “split” the rent? Pretty darn cheap rent for each one, isn’t it? They also get section 8 or haven’t you heard about that yet? Taking section 8 monies from our elderly and disabled who have much less to live on! They also get food stamps, free medical, and anything else you can think of that they take from us.”

    Back in the early ’60s a lot of white kids like me in California picked crops in the summer. Work was paid differently. A 20lb lug of tomatoes paid $0.25 – that’s right a quarter of a dollar. It was how fast you worked that counted. My SS report seems to prove that the big corporation I worked for (Spreckels) never paid taxes or SS deductions on my labor, even though I was required to have a SS card to work. Older white Californians I have known also worked in the fields, only it was even more common. The only thing preventing it today is the system, which is owned by the Hispanic run union.

  • jack in Chicago

    Lauren writes:

    “American Agriculture is astonishingly efficient, and does not need suggestions from outsiders.”

    Jack Replies:

    Hey Lauren – here’s a suggestion from an outsider:

    Don’t betray our people – don’t work to bring in hundreds of thousands of NW aliens who will destroy our civilization.

    Honest prostitution is a far more honorably way to earn a living that being a neo slave agribusiness traitor.

  • Anonymoose

    This just in. No business owner is guaranteed a supply of any factor of production at the price they choose. Maybe these farmers should mechanize more, or grow something that requires less labor.

    Or, as Thomas Sowell once suggested, we could stop growing our own food, and buy the agricultural surpluses of other countries. Maybe not such a good idea.

    Or we could rationalize the process of hiring foreign labor to work our crops. Oops, I forgot. That might cost money. Sorry I brought it up.

  • george00

    The way it used to be done is temporary work visas. They come in do the work then leave. We always had plenty of vegetables and fruit and no massive third world invasion. It’s that simple. Go back to the way it used to be done.

    The media is always distorting things to make it out like nonwhites are the best thing to happen to white people since sliced bread.

  • Anonymous

    32 — george00 wrote at 4:33 AM on May 31:

    The way it used to be done is temporary work visas. They come in do the work then leave. We always had plenty of vegetables and fruit and no massive third world invasion. It’s that simple. Go back to the way it used to be done.

    The media is always distorting things to make it out like nonwhites are the best thing to happen to white people since sliced bread.

    —————————

    Yes. We used to call it the Bracero program. But make sure that they cannot ever bring their families with them or “marry” a U.S. citizen, have no rights that Americans have, no living in our towns and cities or DRIVING a vehicle on our roads, in other words, they have to live in certain areas and the farmers need to be held responsible to furnish housing,(tents) or whatever.

  • Bon, From the Land of Babble

    Older white Californians I have known also worked in the fields, only it was even more common. The only thing preventing it today is the system, which is owned by the Hispanic-run union.

    My mother picked and boxed peaches in the summer in Central California’s 100+ degree heat to put herself through college.

    My dad worked the truck gardens in Indiana to survive after he left home at 16

    I’d look at little closer at the Hispanic-run union. I doubt there are any Hispanics at the upper levels “calling the shots.”

    Bon

  • Dario

    I don’t know where early poster Stephen lives, but here in Connecticut, one of the most expensive states in the Union, $12.50 per hour is considered very good for us in the lower classes. Not prestigious, but much better than what we have now.

    It’d sure also bring down the youth unemployment. If a farmer offered me $12.50 an hour to pick lettuce part time, I’d do it in a heartbeat. I’d drop the current supermarket where I work in a hot second.

  • Anonymoose

    If you want a guest worker program, here’s what you do. Bring in the number of workers needed. Allow them to work maybe eight consecutive months in a calender year, no more.

    Pay them a payment on arrival, put some percentage of their pay in an account or send it back home immediately. Pay them anything they are owed when they leave. Send them where they are needed when they are needed.

    Yeah, it’s a tough life. But you compensate people for the privations they suffer — doing outdoor work, being away from their families, living under sometimes primitive conditions, and not being able to stay here.

    Another thing to do is use people who are here already to do farm work. Probably, the number of native born whites, blacks, Hispanics or others who would do this work would number in the millions. You just have to get them where they are needed, and pay the price of procuring and compensating labor.

    If changing the system meant less food at higher prices, well, that could be a benefit! LOL. If it meant subsidies for farmers, that’s better than having millions of illegal immigration come into the United States every decade.

  • Strider

    Anonymous (#22) griped: Why can’t farmers switch to greenhouses in the fall and winter and grow crops all year round? Why can’t they also grow crops like pineapples, cocoa beans, coffee, sugar cane, bananas and every other item we have to import?

    Gee, could it be because those things won’t grow here?? (Except for pineapples, sugar cane and coffee, which grow only in Hawaii.) All of those are tropical plants that require tropical weather to survive. Don’t you think that if all that stuff could be grown in US greenhouses, they already would be? Even if the right conditions could be artificially produced, the cost would be astronomical and the products would be unaffordable. Unless, that is, you don’t mind paying $40 for a single banana or $20 for a small Hershey bar. Unfortunately, there are simply some foods that can never be grown in any domestic climate, and will therefore have to be imported.

    Of course, if the North American tectonic plate keeps moving south, much of the land currently occupied by the US will become tropical and able to support those crops — in a few million years. In the meantime, the best solution is what several people have written here: use robots or other machines to replace as much human labor as possible.

  • Topper

    I have a very simple cure for this problem.

    Call into service all those tens of thousands of blacks to claim to have been farmers and are now seeking to win a Ghetto Lottery with lawsuits claiming racism.

    Honestly how many blacks do you think could last one day doing real farm work?

  • anonymous

    Strider wrote at 9:12 PM on May 31:

    Anonymous (#22) griped: Why can’t farmers switch to greenhouses in the fall and winter and grow crops all year round? Why can’t they also grow crops like pineapples, cocoa beans, coffee, sugar cane, bananas and every other item we have to import?

    Gee, could it be because those things won’t grow here?? (Except for pineapples, sugar cane and coffee, which grow only in Hawaii.) All of those are tropical plants that require tropical weather to survive. Don’t you think that if all that stuff could be grown in US greenhouses, they already would be? Even if the right conditions could be artificially produced, the cost would be astronomical and the products would be unaffordable. Unless, that is, you don’t mind paying $40 for a single banana or $20 for a small Hershey bar. Unfortunately, there are simply some foods that can never be grown in any domestic climate, and will therefore have to be imported.

    _______________________________________

    Scare story all the way around. And no, we don’t need American farmers to grow crops we already import. Buying foreign crops is one way we can help people improve conditions in their own country. A chocolate bar will never be $20 or a banana $40 in today’s prices.

  • diversity = adversity

    It sounds to me like all the “migrant workers” avoiding georgia are actually criminals and they know it. Either that or political groups claiming to represent them are lying to them about the nature of the legislation. they may be telling the workers that it is an explicit anti-hispanic / mestizo law.

    Either way, unemployed _Americans_ should be working instead of migrants.

    Suddenly this reminds me of some “diversity sensitivity training” I had to read in junior high. Some fake story about a boy -in a migrant worker family- whom liked to play the trumpet.

    Unemployed american georgians: get in shape, get a sun hat, some sunscreen, and a shovel and go get to work!

    You know, however, the governmedia only lists people getting unemployment benefits as “unemployed”. The true unemployment rate is much higher than reported.

  • d=a

    @#10_ just a thought.: you have a point and you may be on to something there, I admit I can be the over pessimistic, but you are right we don’t need cynicism we need outreach.

    And the farmers do you need to take down “white need not apply” signs. If these unemployed americans did more cash-under-the-table business the way illegals do and refuse to pay taxes then the governmedia would a penniless and powerless to stop us.

    9_ anonymous is right we need a return to our gardening and farming roots.