Tancredo Questions ‘Bizarre’ Restrictions on Illegal Alien Detention

T.Q. Houlton, Office of Rep. Tom Tancredo, September 14, 2007

Congressman says policies give preferential treatment to illegal aliens

U.S. Representative Tom Tancredo (R-Littleton, CO) today sent a letter to Director John Torres of the Office of Detention and Removal Operations (DRO) expressing concern over new regulations forced onto local jails across the country that detain illegal aliens. The new regulation requires jails to ban the use of tasers on inmates in any detention facility temporarily housing illegal aliens.

“I think most citizens would think it extremely bizarre for the federal government to say that tasers must never be used on an illegal alien when their use is legal for citizens,” Tancredo said. “I hope that DRO will pull back from any effort to impose its “taser rule” on jails operated by local law enforcement.”

Tancredo also questioned a policy that requires that illegal aliens receive a “bed” rather than a “pad” when the use of pads is legal for citizens.

Tancredo asked, “Why is there a different standard for the accommodation of illegal aliens than for citizens?”

Finally, Tancredo asked DRO about the possibility of authorizing “tent cities” for the detention of illegal aliens apprehended on the border instead of the far more expensive program being used in the Del Rio Sector of pursuing federal prosecution and detention in local jails on a per diem reimbursement. He also asked if there are any statutory barriers or DRO Detention Standards that would prohibit the use of these detention sites.

Tancredo concluded, “I hope that the DRO will reconsider forcing unworkable mandates on the law enforcement people who are trying to detain illegal aliens. Law enforcement needs more tools, not more restrictions, in the fight against illegal immigration.”

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